Botox is well-known for erasing wrinkles, but it's also being used for everything from migraines to depression. Is it really a miracle drug, or is it too good to be true?
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KC Taylor: For migraines. Martha Fritz: I tried anything and everything. KC Taylor: To muscle pain. Cheryl Laureano: I was at the point of desperation. KC Taylor: To depression. Kathleen Delano: I wasn’t interested in talking or communicating with friends and family. Botox does more than just smooth away wrinkles. Male: That uncomfortable at all? Martha Fritz: Just a little pick. KC Taylor: Martha treats his migraines used to stop her from doing everyday activities, but botox injections have capture headache free. Martha Fritz: I don’t miss work as much. I don’t miss my son’s baseball games. So botox has made a dramatic difference in my life. KC Taylor: It’s also made a difference in Cheryl Laureano’s life. Sheryl suffers from Torticollis, her neck muscle spasm involuntarily causing incorrect posture and pain. Cheryl Laureano: If I were to just completely relax using my head just starts turning itself. The injection stopped the problem in neck muscles from contracting. Zhigao Huang: Improves the contraction of the muscle, improved the head position, improve the pain. KC Taylor: The drug also helped with Kathleen Delano’s depression. A small study found botox relieve depression in nine of ten women. The theory. Eric Finzi: You’re basically preventing people from expressing those sad and angry emotions on their face. KC Taylor: The botox may knock them worry free. A recent study by Italian researches revealed when the toxin in botox was injected into mice incomparable doses to those used in humans, it travel to the brain stem in three days. Last year the FDA issued a warning that botox has been linked to respiratory failure and death, but for these women, the drug has offered relief when nothing else could. I’m KC Taylor reporting.

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