Deborah De Santis-Moniaci Ph.D. Assistant Director, Kids Weight Down Program Clinical Psychology. Maimonides Infants & Children's Hospital of Brooklyn
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Host: What's a BMI? Deborah De Santis: So BMI stands for Body Mass Index. It's actually a ratio of your height to your weight. So basically it gives us a sense of for your height and your age, what should you weight be. Host: So in adult we know this magic figure 25 and if it's over 30, oh, forget it, real battle. Okay but that 25 would not be true for a 10 year old. So the doctor will give you a percentile or convert it to what you know what adult figures are, which I happened to do in my practice. Deborah De Santis: And all pediatrician should be doing that. And if we are not, we should be asking for it. Host: Watching New York State all these adolescence charts regularly one of the things they look for if we actually took BMIs for New York state, has a very lightened, New York city, Head of Department that works all the calories and the fast food stuff, he is doing a terrific job, he is getting people aware, that's half the battle. So that's important. But there is another side of the coin. If you look at the other side which I am getting sometimes I don't want to get heavy and not even too thin. So it has to be a good balance between too heavy and too thin. There are two types of eating disorders. Deborah De Santis: Absolutely. Male Speaker: But the BMI is very important. It came up and it's a pretty smile for us, do you even know where that came from? Female Speaker: Yeah, actually I don't know. Male Speaker: Probably some guy who worked in the Department of Health in weekends and put it up because the substitution value came some GP and New York City many, many years ago and you he changing it out and I forgot the guy's name and people even don't even know it and then weight watcher people probably picked up on it and they made billions of dollars and he probably has now got some place for it. That was pretty a good idea, because people don't like calories but they know to control American health, little protein here, little protein here but they know they know the size, the servings, people can put them here pretty easily. That was pretty smart thought. Deborah De Santis: Yes. Counting calories is very difficult and families often ask me, tell me how many calories I should eat in a day, tell me if you stick to portions, if you stick to what you need for different kinds of food each day, you don't need to count calories. If you are making reasonable healthy decisions and you are eating your normal good portions.

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