In this medical health video learn about the difference between Bioengineering and Avian-Based Hyaluronic Acid (HA).
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What are the benefits of Bioengineered vs. Avian-Based HA? Dr. Stanley Dysart: Euflexxa is bioengineered, that is, it's produced by a bacterial fermentation process and then the active ingredient is extracted, purified, washed and is ready for an injectable form. It's not avian, it's not produced by using chickens or roosters or any animal product and that's the advantage, and that's what makes it helpful at least in my element area. Jeffrey Rosen: People sometimes worry that there's a negative connotation that comes along with bacteria that bacteria are bad. We use bacteria for many good things in health and science. So bacteria can be used like little factories that can be engineered to produce substances and molecules that we want. Dr. Stanley Dysart: The newest HA is derived by a bioengineered process. And by that I mean it's a bacterial fermentation process that produces a hyaluronate. So we take a bacteria that doesn't cause disease, it produces the hyaluronate, you extract it, you wash it, you purify it, and you take that sterile product and use that for injection. It's not avian. It's not produced by chicken or rooster combs, it's not derived by chicken or rooster products. Therefore, it's more pure in a sense that it's done in a bioengineered fashion. Jeffrey Rosen: Bacteria are also used in fermentation process to help develop good wine products that people enjoy for culinary aspects and we can use bacteria to help with pollution aspects as well. Bacteria have been designed to help with oil spills, to help consumed oil on the tops of the water where there have been oil spills, and in health and science world through genetic engineering or through the natural occurrence of bacteria, we can use bacteria to help develop better science products. Dr. Stanley Dysart: If you can take a product, if you can engineer it or create it in some fashion and bacterial fermentation is one, you create a product that's more pure, that's more controlled and easier to use. Jeffrey Rosen: The claims of the products that are designed to be biologically engineered through bacterial fermentation process are that they are 99.9% free of any detectable impurities. Dr. Stanley Dysart: It seems that a bioengineered product since its more pure is more usually tolerated. And if we take a look at studies, you seem do have a lower incidence or lower chance of happening of knee pain, swelling or effusions or other type of reactions to the injectable products. That's one reason what I prefer a bioengineered product. Jeffrey Rosen: There have been studies that have demonstrated impurities within some of the products on the market. Some of these impurities are thought to result in adverse reaction such as swollen joints after injection therapy. It is also a concern that if there are impurities in some of the products that repeat injection therapies meaning patients who have undergone the treatment more than one time, may develop a sensitivity or almost like an allergic reaction to some of the impurities in the products. Dr. Stanley Dysart: The Kirchner study published in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, journal, looked at a bioengineered product, HA versus a cross-linked product and the study findings were interesting. They found that in the bioengineered products, they were less effusions, they were less reactions in the joint and that the product was better tolerated overall, compared to a cross-linked product. Jeffrey Rosen: Two of the products that were compared and the bioengineered product was found to have more beneficial effects and positive outcomes for the patients with regard to pain relief and less use of what we call rescue pain medications or the use of Tylenol to treat breakthrough pain and less adverse events such as bad reactions or swelling and redness around the joint. Dr. Stanley Dysart: The Kirchner study also showed that comparing the bioengineered product with a cross-linked product, they found their patients required less med

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