In this medical video learn more about the innovations being made in the field of hip replacement.
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Jennifer Matthews: Pat Brown knows what it takes to run a successful print shop. Pat Brown: It's constant juggling all day long. Decisions. Doing. You're never bored. Jennifer Matthews: But when arthritis in her hip slowed pat down, her normal 65 hour work week became a thing of the past. Pat Brown: It's like you're dragging a hundred pound weight on your leg at all times. When you can't stand, bend, walk, you can't help. Jennifer Matthews: Pat knew she needed surgery but was reluctant to get it. Pat Brown: Like, I can't be out of work that long. I can't be laid up that long. Jennifer Matthews: But Doctor Jeffrey Rosen offered pat a less-invasive hip surgery. Instead of one long incision down the leg, he makes two tiny slits. He separates the muscles, instead of cutting them, which means less pain. Dr. Jeffrey Rosen: It's a lot less traumatic to the tissues. There's a lot less bleeding during surgery. The postoperative pain is a lot less. The hospital stay is a lot shorter, and the rehabilitation is a lot quicker. Jennifer Matthews: Here's how it works. Doctor Rosen splits the muscles and implants a socket. Then, he cuts this bone, inserts a stem and puts a ball on top. That ball attaches to the socket. To get the large prosthesis through the one-inch incision, Doctor Rosen has to be extremely precise. That precision pays off for patients like Pat. She was back to binding, lifting and boxing in just four weeks. That would have taken four months with standard surgery. Pat Brown: Now that you can do it, you're just living life large. You think, 'I got it going on, and it's just wonderful. Jennifer Matthews: And for Pat, it doesn't get any better than that. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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