In this medical video learn more about a 'better' bypass surgery that uses a new technology to track the effectiveness of the procedure.
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Ernest Frost: It felt like that, that pressure, as if someone had a knuckle pressing into a muscle. Jennifer Matthews: Ernest Frost is describing the feeling he'd get between his shoulder blades if he walked no faster than this. Ernest Frost: It would build up so that it was very uncomfortable. Jennifer Matthews: Ernest had heart trouble. He needed a bypass operation. In most cases, surgeons don't know if the surgery is a success until after the procedure. But doctors used a new technology -- called spy -- to track ernest's surgery. Dr. Marc Pelletier: It gives us a roadmap of the arteries on the heart and of the bypass that we've done. Jennifer Matthews: A green dye is injected in the heart and attaches to proteins in the blood. It emits light when stimulated by a laser. Watch as the dye lights up blood flowing through the arteries -- showing Doctor Pelletier that the bypass is working. Dr. Marc Pelletier: I'd rather take an extra 15, 20 minutes during the operation to do something if it's going to mean an extra several years for the patient. Jennifer Matthews: The system allows him to fix a bypass while patients are still on the table ... Sparing them from another surgery or angioplasty. For Ernest, it meant peace of mind from the moment he woke up. Ernest Frost: They were commenting that it went well, so I felt very good. Jennifer Matthews: He's now walking with no pain and without any worry about the success of his surgery. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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