This is a medical video in the improvements of Cancer body scans.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Feeding these emus is one of the simple things that bring a smile to Kathy Kiske's face. She doesn't take moments like these for granted. She's battled cancer four times. Kathy Kiske: I have had a tumor in my neck. I have had multiple lesions upper torso. Jennifer Matthews: But it was the last tumor doctors almost missed. Doctor Medhat Osman just started working at the hospital where Kathy took her PET scan to see if her cancer returned. Dr. Medhat Osman: The typical whole body covers from the base of the skull to the upper thigh. Jennifer Matthews: But doctor Osman was the first doctor to have Kathy go-through something called a true whole body scan, a scan that extends from the top of the skull to the bottom of the feet. Dr. Medhat Osman: In Kathy's case, her lesion was in the left knee right about there. So unless we image that portion of her body, we would have totally missed her cancer. Jennifer Matthews: That decision saved her life. The normal scan would have stopped just inches above her tumor. Dr. Medhat Osman: If she is having the PET scan anywhere else in the world, she will be sent home with a clean bill of health. Jennifer Matthews: Instead, Kathy was sent into the operating room where the tumor was removed. 100 patients took the true whole body scan. Doctor's found cancerous tumors in 8 of them, 8 people whose cancer may have been missed. Kathy Kiske: There are more and more survivors out there every day. Jennifer Matthews: Survivors like Kathy whose life is off and running, cancer-free. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement