Better Balance with Rocket Science Video

In this health video learn how space-age technology is helping patients with balance disorders stay up on their feet.
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Jennifer Matthews: Mike loves shaping young minds. That is when he's not worried about falling over. Mike Marion: I looked like a drunken sailor and I was afraid I was going to get thrown out of school. Jennifer Matthews: A few years ago, a bike accident left Mike with unexplained dizziness. Today, he's undergoing a unique therapy. And yes, it really is rocket science. Connie Weglarz: The NeuroCom Balance Manager was developed by a NASA rocket scientist to take a look at balance in astronauts. Amy Ariss: So what this does is it gives us a picture of the center of gravity. Jennifer Matthews: The space age balance booth -- Mike Marion: Is kind of like being on a surfboard. Jennifer Matthews: Helps identify what's causing the unsteadiness. Infrared goggles tracks Mike's eyes, an audiologists test Mike's hearing and inner ear. Together, the tests and special exercises offer a new hope to help diagnose, then correct problems that make patients unsteady. For Mike, the problem turned out to be damage to a nerve in his inner ear. Amy Ariss: We can make him better and that's a great feeling. Connie Weglarz: Very good Rosemary. Jennifer Matthews: Rosemary is learning to walk again. In this booth, Rosemary learns to negotiate real-life hazards, helping her regain her stability and her confidence. Rosemary Roberts: I'm a very independent person and this has helped me to be the old me. Connie Weglarz: There you go. Jennifer Matthews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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