This health video focuses on the best way to treat those who suffer from Osteoporosis.
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Judi Sheridan: I don't want to have a broken bone. Jennifer Matthews: Judi Sheridan wants to keep her body strong. She has osteoporosis -- a condition that puts her at risk for broken bones. The drug fosamax helped improve her bone density. Judi Sheridan: To me the real proof was about two years ago. I fell down the stairs here at work, almost a full flight of stairs, on my hip. I had terrible bruises, but I didn't break a singe bone. Jennifer Matthews: Now, a new study shows fosamax is even more effective when taken with another drug. Lead scientist, Dennis Black says that's good news for patients at risk for fractures. Dr. Dennis Black: Roughly half the people who can live independently before a hip fracture are not able to live independently after a hip fracture. Jennifer Matthews: Researchers gave postmenopausal women the bone-building drug PTH for one year followed by a year on Fosamax. Dr. Dennis Black: Using the two drugs in a sequential manner is clearly the optimal way to combine them. Jennifer Matthews: The study showed women who took the two drugs had about a 30 percent increase in a certain type of bone density. Those who only took PTH had a 14 percent increase and those who only took Fosamax had a seven percent increase. The combination offered more improvements than any other drug regimen studied. Dr. Dennis Black: That's where the big payoff would come. Then, if you have a fall, instead of fracturing your hip and ending up in the hospital and having to have a new hip put in from surgery, that you could avoid the whole thing. Jennifer Matthews: Judy hopes to do just that. Judi Sheridan: I expect to live a long and healthy life. Jennifer Matthews: A goal that this new research may help her accomplish. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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