Baby Sign Language Video

In this video, we learn about baby sign language with Huma Nasir.
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Emma Howard: Do you want to strengthen the bond with your baby about being able to communicate with them before they can speak? Well, with baby sign language you can by using the Sign with Your Baby program parents can enable babies to communicate issues before they are able to express themselves verbally. With me in the studio it's Huma Nasir who has self experience fantastic results learning the Sign with Your Baby method with her young family and teaches signing in workshops in South London and she has brought along one of her students. Welcome and you put the rest of the family Reese is the result of you learning, isn't he Sigrun? And how many signs has he got now? Sigrun Griffiths: He has got about 7 or 8 signs that he uses regularly. Emma Howard: And then you taught your husband Paul so both of you sign with him? Paul Griffiths: That's right. Emma Howard: I know he is quite resistant, he has been very good, but we are going to -- oh! Is he going to sign now? That's the sign for more, isn't it? Sigrun Griffiths: Yes, that's the sign for more. Emma Howard: So Huma, tell us what we've got Paul happily sitting on a sofa? Tell me how does that work, how do you begin teaching your baby to sign? Huma Nasir: Well, basically babies learn through reputation and they love to mimic adults, so basically you start off the sign with your baby programs been developed by somebody names Joseph Garcia who is one of the pioneers in baby signing. Joseph recommends that from around the age of 7 months you can start using signs with your baby. They have enough intellectual development and enough basic physical control of their hands to sort of gather what you're saying. Emma Howard: Are we talking about sign language that's the British sign language? So the adults work with you? Huma Nasir: Joseph's program recommends that whichever country you're in, you use the standard sign language for that country. So for example here in England we obviously use British sign language. Emma Howard: And have you adopted it so if the baby, because some movements will be quite helpful as well? Huma Nasir: Some of the words have been adopted for use by babies. For example, the sign for milk in British sign language is this which is quite difficult. So it's been adopted. Because the program has been developed for preverbal hearing babies and it's not geared towards deaf babies although it has been used by deaf. Emma Howard: So how do you start? So she went along to your workshop, a two-hour workshop. Huma Nasir: Yes, she did. Emma Howard: And what are the basics? What do you teach first of all? Huma Nasir: Well, basically I tell them about the background of the program and how Joseph developed it. I signed with my own daughter and I talk about my own experience which I think is invaluable, because signing is still a very, very a new concept toward in the UK and unfortunately there is a lot of negativity that surrounds it and immediately you'd be asked is your baby deaf or wouldn't it affect their speech? So I try to give people as much information so that they feel comfortable with they're doing. Emma Howard: And how did you Sigrun, I mean people are concerned that will low speech down? How it has been you experience at all? Sigrun Griffiths: No. Reese is bilingual. I'm Icelandic and my husband is English. So I did ask Huma about that will this confusion him or will it help, and Huma was absolutely adamant that it would help and it has. I mean we were warned that Reese would start to speak later, because he had two languages to learn, but he is not 15 months and he speaks about 10 words and then has 7 signs on top of that. So I can't say that he is ... Emma Howard: And what are those signs he has? Because you start with three basics one is that you milk we just found out about and what are the other twos? Huma Nasir: This sign for eat. Emma Howard: So food, obviously. Humar Nasir: We are mimicking eating and the sign for more. Emma Howard: So those are the fi

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