Joanne Gerenser Ph.D is the Executive Director of the Eden II Programs in Staten Island, New York. Autism Expert
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Host: We study a lot these cancers in a very unique way. We report, of course we get permission, what we are doing, we get protocols that are shared, so we know that -- first level, say, of leukemia it was certain type of markers we treat this way and we see what happens, it get improves, it work good, 20 places it's same thing, and it sounds oh cut the dose because they are toxic a little bit, same results and we get the doses reduced, we get great results. I don't know maybe a more; I don't see autism is studied like cancer. Why couldn’t we have a proper label and share the information on day-to-day, okay, if someone does an ABA type of technique in a certain way or forward to, whatever the thing that is your way and some of the next progress that kid has certain data diagnosed labeled characteristics, we can make progress. May be a medicine helped a kid, we don't know, I don't know how the stuff, it get works but the point is we do it in a good faith way. Couldn’t we make the same kind of progress where we used to have a virtually no when living through leukemia in the 40s till now when 80% cure rate Joanne E. Gerenser: It's not possible at this point. Host: Why? Joanne E. Gerenser: Because when you get diagnosed of leukemia, I can document medically that you have leukemia, I can't say here are -- Host: Okay, I don't even say. So why can't we label autistic diagnostic specialist certified especially that they go in, they have worked for any of these forgetful places, they go and they say this kid fits type 1A, 1B, 1C? Joanne E. Gerenser: I think they are beginning to do that. There is some excellent research, for example. Host: We are talking about more people, you have a reputable institution and you know the reputation, but there are some who aren't so reputable. I heard them, I mean you will not have to believe this, there is a place I am not even sure where it is, they over-diagnosed certain types of kids of autism and a year later, they make the diagnosis correct when they are milder. It looks like it did some good, they get funding and that path is right and I found it to be true. Now that is an exception thing for it. One of the developmental set is I have talked to people to do these programs under three, most of them are reputable. Yet, I found one that is speech pathologist that went to someone’s house who didn't speak English and they are doing it for him. Now look, you taught to deceive that there is evil in the world and you would try your best. If you could find a cure for autism tomorrow and put yourself by that business, you'd live happily. And so you will just sell apples in the corner but what bothers me I would like to see one of these cherries, I have no idea what they do with it or cut the money. Spend money and say, let's get a cooperation of all the reputable places, create a national cooperative study, everybody has a label. This is a 1A type, 1B type. We are doing this, where we put on a national basis, no one gains extra funding, no advantages, all we gain is good results. We are trying to tell that this type of kid would do better with the odd therapy, ABA and this kid wouldn't. You think you are right. Do like a need a little more help, would you? Joanne E. Gerenser: Yeah, I would, although my argument differs like I do think that is beginning to happen. I think that there are multi-collaborative projects going on throughout the country that are funded, they are looking very specifically. I know for example, in Pennsylvania they are doing some research, people who are not the providers of service, so they are not benefiting financially from this method or this -- Host: That is important. Joanne E. Gerenser: They are evaluating the efficacy of this method versus this method versus this method. I think that there are some mode of issues that are going to be very complicated and so in other words, it is not just autism, by the way, I mean look at regular education, reading programs. There are 50 dif

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