Learn about autism and the autism screening process in children. Steven Pavlakis MD Pediatric Neurology Medical School: Brown University Resident/Fellowship: Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center DrMDK.com
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Interviewer: The American can be at pediatrics is solely like saying that pediatricians that a couple select periods of time should screen for autism. First of all, what would a pediatrician be looking for if he thought maybe some of the early signs of autism from your experience would be that what a doctor should be looking for? Interviewee: Well, they are really strict for diagnosis of autism in the modern age and one is children that have points of personal skills, second is they have language impairments and the third is that they have repetitive behaviors. Interviewer: Well, a four month old does not talk, so what would you look at a four month old so to like a little communication is something that says maybe there is a red flag, we have concern. Interviewee: Well, a four month old may not be moving as well as another four month, it might not mean that is going to be autistic but it might mean that it might have neurological problems, it may be floppy. Four months olds do make eye contact and they do have some social skills but not so much that it is hard to distinguish between what is abnormal and what is normal. Interviewer: Will they smile looking at the mothers face in four months? Interviewee: Oh yes they do and they would even smile with other’s faces by four months but again, this is not a very quantitative kind of thing. Interviewer: Have you seeing kid that was not looking at the mother at all, was not smiling at the mother or looking for a smile back in four months would be a great concern about it? Interviewee: Yes of course you would worry about that child. Interviewer: And if a kid was about a year old and was not doing any form of communication, that means the only words that express communication which is reaching out, trying to get you to do things, would that also be a concern sir? Interviewee: Yes that would be a red flag. Interviewer: Now, if either one of those two cases were there, would that be a good reason to refer to a pediatric neurologist for infant stimulation developmental type of program? Interviewee: Sure, if there are any delays, those children should be referred to either pediatric neurologist or a developmental pediatrician or just to depending on how extreme the delays are and what is going on for an early intervention program.

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