Autism - Restriced, Repetitive Behavior Video

Barbara L. Trommer MD Pediatric Neurology . Associate Director, Maimonides Developmental Center . Medical School: Columbia University . Fellowship: Children's Memorial Hospital Northwestern University Medical School Pediatric Neurology
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Third core symptom has to do with this Restricted, Repetitive, Stereotyped behavior. in play skills, it may be that all you see is sensory-motor play; twirling, mouthing, banging. It may be that the play that you see is ritualistic; spinning the wheels on a car, instead of making it go along an imaginary highway to get from place A to place B, lining up cars or crayons instead of using them or playing with them. There is sometimes a preference for common objects: strings, sticks, rocks, pens, rather than manufactured toys, exception is trains, and someone pointed out to me, that's because trains are meant to be lined up. But Thomas the Tank Engine is a very popular toy among kids on the Autistic Spectrum. Unless he has gone out of favor because of paint contamination, I think you guys would know more about that than I would. Is Thomas still popular? Still out there? How does Restricted, Repetitive, Stereotyped manifest itself in terms of interests and activities and behaviors? The Stereotype is usually present after the age of 3. They can be finger flicking, unusual gaze. Do you what the unusual gaze is? Its looking out of the corner of your eye, usually following a linear surface. I don't know if that's because it provides an interesting stimulation to have your eye just deviated. One of the psychologist at the Developmental Center said that if you do that, you induce nystagmus and you get the object to move, and that is an interesting stimulation. What else? We see habitual toe-walking, sniffing and licking nonfood items. There can be self injurious behaviors, head banging, skin picking, eye poking, hand biting. We can see what Isabel Rapin calls carrying a prop: a pen, a flashlight, keys, action figures. Props are held all of the time and they are different from transitional objects. Transitional objects are teddy bears that the child endows with animal like or human like qualities, and makes you put the teddy bear to -- tuck the teddy bear in with him or kiss the teddy bear or talk to the teddy bear, but props are not invested with emotional content. They are just carried. If in Asperger Disorder, in the older children, this core feature may actually be manifested as a restriction related to topics, like the Rain Man memorizing train schedules. It is not interest in a particular topic that's abnormal, it's the obsession, it's the degree, it's the fact that all they talk about is dinosaurs and they know everything about it.

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