Les Linet MD Psychiatry DrMDK.com
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We are now going to discuss Autism, by Dr. Les Linet. Linet: Hello. I am a board certified psychiatrist, a board certified general adult psychiatrist and also in child and adolescent psychiatrist too. In talking about Autism, what I would like to do first is to explain it the way it is. it's not just speech delay or mental retardation, it's something like fever. Fever doesn't necessarily tell us the diagnosis, it's a symptom. When we make diagnosis especially in psychiatry, we make it syndromely, by that I mean, it has to have basically taste, the color, the shape, the size, odor of an elephant, and not a big mess. It's got fluffy ear, fluffy ears and trunk and enough things, than we have a diagnosis. So, Autism involves an impairment in the social brain. When human beings first arrived on this planet, they had some problems to solve, reproduction, sleeping and eating. But as we all know all the other animals they've already solved that problem, the big deal about being human, was dealing with the most treacherous, dangerous creature that had ever existed on the planet, and that was our fellow homosepians, and that's really where the social brain came in. You had to become a psychologist, you had to be able to get a beat on the other person, you get a feeling for them. I think a nice example just to get to started is, a boy I saw who went to high school who was artistic and had a football rally, beginning of the season. The Cheer leader came out and he said things like, does anybody think that ZOOZOO high school can beat us, and my patient stood up, and raised the reasons why he thought the other school is going to win. He completely missed a meaning, a social meaning of the experience, and he heard the question as a technical question. He thought which team was better. So what's involved in Autism is largely difficulty in relating, we see symptoms such as poor eye contact, when speech is not terrible paired, we also see problems with intimation, there is a feel -- we all have this. When we talk to somebody and when you are relating to somebody, there are nuances. So there maybe use of words, both in -- difficulty in also repeating words. They don't -- patients with Autism don't have a good feel for relatedness. There is another example; this is of a famous, relatively famous person, named Temple Grandin, who is autistic, a high functioning autistic individual dealing with Asperger syndrome. She has a doctorate and has done work in the humane slaughter of cattle, because cattle do get upset when they are lined up and they see the cattle in front of them killed. So she designed a very humane, a much more human way of doing this so that very next victim doesn't see that previous one. But when people visit her, she has learned a correct way to meet people. She will take your coat, she will offer you tea or something like this, but you get the feeling that she has learned it, and just really not there. She is very bright, but she doesn't know how to do things. She also has said that she - it took her a long time to adjust with her dog and a cat. This is something a little child normally has no trouble with. She has learned to look at the tail, the wagging tail of the dog. it's, a little harder to explain - I don't know that I will be really be able to explain, it's an interesting aspect of this illness - in a moment, where otherwise quite intelligent. But in addition to in which the difficulty was related, there often are language problems, and there is often difficulty in shifting from one task to another or shifting in a new environment -- we often call this insistence on saying this. Kids with Autism often are - will become preoccupied by water riding or -- in the old days when we had record players, they often just watched the record going around. It maybe - we don't necessarily understand this, it maybe that there are just more comfortable with non human activities, so they can become involved in this. People are too com

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