Atrial Fibrillation Treatments - Multaq Video

Signs of atrial fibrillation may not last long, and they can come and go. But people should consult their doctor if they feel their heart racing rapidly or if they experience other symptoms that come on quickly – particularly if they are older and...
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[Music Playing] Sherry Demeterco: Atrial Fibrillation is potentially life-threatening, placing a significant burden on patients, healthcare providers, hospitals, and Canada's healthcare system. Medical experts who treat this chronic condition are excited about the Health Canada approval of Multaq, also known as Dronedarone, because it's the first new treatment for the management of Atrial Fibrillation to come on the market enclosed to 20 years. Dr. Stuart Connolly, Director of the Division of Cardiology at McMaster University in Hamilton and a researcher who has published several articles in the field of Atrial Fibrillation says, Multaq represents an important new treatment option for the management of Atrial Fibrillation. Dr. Stuart Connolly: The last time that there was a new drug released in Canada for the management of Atrial Fibrillation was more than two decades ago. So this is a unique advance, that's very timely. Physicians are going to change the way they treat patients with Atrial Fibrillation because of the availability of Multaq. It's going to be important for patients and their doctors to have new options. Sherry Demeterco: Over the past 20 years, hospital admissions for AF have increased by 66%. In fact, Atrial Fibrillation is a leading cause of hospitalizations for arrhythmia. There are more than 43,000 AF patients admitted to hospital in this country each year. As hospitalizations account for more than half or 52% of the costs associated with Atrial Fibrillation, Multaq may help ease pressure on our healthcare system. While reducing the chance that patients would need to be hospitalized for related complications. Dr. Paul Dorian is Director of the Division of Cardiology at St. Michael's Hospital and says that reducing cardiovascular hospitalizations is a critical element to the management of Atrial Fibrillation. Dr. Paul Dorian: The new medication which is called Dronedarone, it's a new heart rhythm medication. It's the first medication that's been proven in large research studies to reduce the likelihood of a patient going to hospital and staying in hospital. So this is I think an important advance in the treatment of Atrial Fibrillation. Sherry Demeterco: Some of those hospitalizations are related to stroke, the most serious consequence of Atrial Fibrillation. In fact, the incidence of stroke is three to five times higher in people with Atrial Fibrillation. According to physicians, the elderly, those who have suffered a previous stroke or a TIA known as a Mini-Stroke and patients with heart failure, diabetes or high blood pressure are all at greater risk go suffering from a stroke after being diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation. Dr. Paul Dorian: There is no question that Atrial Fibrillation is a public health concern. The heat rhythm disturbance which is the most common heart rhythm disturbance is increasing rapidly, that we already have up to 200,000 to 400,000 Canadians with this rhythm problem and we know it's going to grow in the future. Sherry Demeterco: In addition to the growing prevalence and serious health consequences that may result from having Atrial Fibrillation, there are also quality-of-life issues that can have an effect on a patient's daily activities. Dr. Stuart Connolly: Multaq was not specifically studied for its effects on quality-of-life. However, there is no doubt in my mind that being admitted to hospital is a very negative experience for patients, and reducing hospitalization will undoubtedly improve quality of life. Sherry Demeterco: It's important for people to recognize the symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation which include heart palpitations, an irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath and dizziness. Dr. Paul Dorian: Some patients with Atrial Fibrillation are completely unaware that they have it. They feel absolutely fine and we discover it when we do a routine examination, for example. Other patients feel terrible during Atrial Fibrillation and they may go to an emergency room or go to

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