Learn about the risks of antibiotic therapy being prescribed for patients with acute rhino sinusitis in this medical report.
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[Music Playing] For Insidermedicine In 60, I'm Essie Heinrich. From Basel, a new study shows that antibiotic therapy should not be routinely prescribed for patients with acute rhinosinusitis. An analysis showed that doctors have to offer antibiotic treatment to 15 patients for one patient to be cured. The number needed to treat dropped to 8 if patients had phlegm-like discharge in their throats. Antibiotics are still likely necessary for children and for those who are immunocompromised. From the Netherlands, a form of bioabsorbable stent may one day be available for those with coronary artery disease. A new study evaluated the effects of such a stent on 30 patients with single vessel heart disease. One year after implantation, only one had a heart attack and no cases of late stent thrombosis were noted. Given the recent problems of late stent thrombosis in drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stent technology may become an important tool in treating coronary artery disease. And finally from Ottawa, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency is warning the public to avoid drinking some types of pear juice for toddlers, as recent analysis has revealed the presence of arsenic in some samples, while no cases of illness have been reported. The agency has identified President's Choice Organics Pear Juice and Beech Nut Pear Juice as being potentially contaminated. Arsenic has been linked to both cancer and developmental diseases in children. For Insidermedicine In 60, I'm Essie Heinrich. [Music Playing]

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