It's anchored in controversy - but is it inevitable? A closer look at cloning.
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Jennifer Matthews: Just about everyone has an opinion. Female Speaker: It's one of those lines that you cross that you're not sure what you're going to find. Male Speaker: There's a price I believe, of course, as to say, in playing God. Female Speaker: I think that if God had wanted us cloned, then he would have had two of us to start with. Jennifer Matthews: President Bush has made his opinion clear, I stand firm in my opposition to human cloning. Numerous countries in Europe, including Great Britain and Italy, have laws to prohibit human cloning. Here at home - California, Louisiana, Michigan, Rhode Island and Virginia have laws to ban human cloning. And at least six other states are considering laws. The concern among many in the scientific community is safety. Dr. William Rideout: If you're actually in the cloning field and you know how many failures we get to each success, you would never even consider trying human cloning. Jennifer Matthews: Experts say less than four percent of attempts result in a live birth. That's ninety-six failures for every one hundred tries - and even the successes are questionable. Dr. William Rideout: To actually make a full human clone, it's a horrifying thought. Jennifer Matthews: While the majority of scientists agree human cloning is dangerous today, there are those like Princeton's Lee Silver who say cloning may eliminate many genetic diseases. Dr. Lee Silver: If a parent doesn't have the disease, then the child won't have the disease, if you're just using cloning to bring about the child. Jennifer Matthews: He says most fears of cloning are rooted in misunderstanding. Dr. Lee Silver: If a child dies in a car accident, you can't bring that child back. All you can ever get if you save one of the cells from that child is a later-born identical twin. Jennifer Matthews: On the other hand, there's therapeutic cloning, which strives not to create a human - but to create body parts compatible for transplant. Dr. Lee Silver: If you can use this technology to overcome some of the defects in nature, I say go ahead and use the technology. Jennifer Matthews: Bioethicist Glenn Mcgee worries that right now - a time when the technology still holds so many concerns - there's no one controlling it. Dr. Glenn McGee: There's a kind of vacuum for governing these technologies in the U.S. Jennifer Matthews: So Perhaps Until The Law Catches Up With Science - Each Person Is Free To Create Their Own Answer. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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