Aneurysm Sensor Video

This medical video explores the new sensor to detect aneurysms.
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Jennifer Matthews: Gene Zeppernick has a passion for fixing cars -- old and new. He diagnoses the problem, then gets to work. So, when Gene was faced with a life-threatening aneurysm -- like all good mechanics, he wanted it fixed. Gene Zeppernick: I had no fear. I knew what I had. I know what happens if you don't get it taken care of, and I'm not ready to go yet. Jennifer Matthews: An abdominal aortic aneurysm is an abnormal ballooning of the abdominal portion of the aorta -- the major artery of the heart. If too much pressure builds, aneurysms can burst. Dr. Daniel Clair: If the pressure in the aneurysm sac is not diminished, then, functionally, we have not corrected the patient's problem, and we've allowed them to remain with a significant pressure in the aneurysm sac, which is the driving force behind the expansion of the aneurysm. Jennifer Matthews: This dime-sized sensor is implanted in the aneurysm sac to pick up even the slightest change. Doctors activate the sensor by holding a tennis racket-shaped device over the abdomen. The device displays pressure readings. Dr. Daniel Clair: So, ideally, what we would like to see is that the pressure sensor gives us the signal that the pressure has decreased dramatically in the aneurysm sac outside of the stent graft. Jennifer Matthews: Gene cannot feel the sensor, but he can feel the benefit. Gene Zeppernick: My aneurysm had already started deflating. The pressure has dropped. Jennifer Matthews: For this self-proclaimed jack of all trades, it means more time to spend with his cars and dog, Charlie. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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