Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Video

Streaming Well shares information about how to become more aware of Alzheimer's disease and how to recognize its symptoms.
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Dr. Patricia Macnair: Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common type of dementia. It’s a progressive disease that affects the brain and damages the person’s ability to think, to remember things, to do all the activities that we normally need to do everyday. Dr. Sean Knox: Typically, you might see that someone is using interest in things that they might have had interest in that they may have had interest in like, you might notice that they’re doing less house work or they’re not so keen to do, their activities or hobbies that they previously really like doing. Fiona Philips: I remember my mother, she just forgot all her pin numbers, she couldn’t get money out of the machine, she always had to ask people to go to the bank with her and we just thought she was getting older and didn’t understand how to use these things but it was actually Alzheimer’s. Dr. Patricia Macnair: Getting a diagnosis is critical because it gives you something to work with. It gives you an answer to why some problems are occurring. It will give the patient and their carers and family an idea of what to expect. Dr. Ruth Hargreaves: I think the reason it’s so important to get a diagnosis is to allow patients and their families and carers to actually do some planning around Alzheimer’s Disease. They know that there will be a deterioration in the condition and it’s important to allow them the opportunity to be able to do as much planning while they’re fit and well as possible Dr. Patricia Macnair: It doesn’t work for work for everyone and it may not be dramatic. But if you get treatment early, you’re more likely to be able to go on living independently in your own way for longer. It can be quite difficult to talk to someone if you are worried about them and you’re thinking that things aren’t quite right because often you only have a very vague non-specific idea of things that aren’t quite right but how, and people can feel quite defensive. Often the person who is involved in the very early stages is aware that something is up and they easily get upset if you approach them. Fiona Philips: I think that the one big thing that you need to remember with someone with Alzheimer’s is that you cannot bombard them with questions because questions are the most difficult things for them to answer. You need to sort of present them with statements and just so that they can say yes or no. Dr. Patricia Macnair: You might want to get them or yourselves together to keep a diary of what’s been going or any problems that have cropped out. And then, if you think that there is some specific memory problems, then that might be the time to go and see the GP to get more expert help. Fiona Philips: An online resource that you can go to to learn about memory problems is about MemoryProblems.com. Dr. Patricia Macnair: That website got lots of great examples and suggestions and descriptions that will help people actually understand a little more yet. This really isn’t quite right, I need to get further help. Fiona Philips: There are the Symptoms of aging and forgetfulness as well. Instead, you can compare the two and decide whether if it actually is just a function of you getting older or whether actually, it is more serious than that and that you actually have a brain disease. But the thing that I found mostly on there was that you have to talk to your doctor. There’s a brilliant list of all the questions that you should ask your doctor which is really, really worth it. If you have a friend or a relative and you’re worried that they may have memory problems or Alzheimer’s Disease, then get on the internet and go to AboutMemoryProblems.com.

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