In this video, Dr. Thaddeus Bell talks about the history of some popular foods in African-American cuisine and how these foods can be a detriment to a person's health.
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Rebecca Fox: From my mother’s mash potatoes to our grandma’s fried chicken, we all have favorite comfort foods from our childhood that we indulgent from time to time. Its one those comfort foods become a part of our everyday diet that our waistlines in health can suffer. And here today to talk about this culinary fits falls is Family Practice Physician Dr. Thaddeus Bell. Thank you so much for being here. Dr. Thaddeus Bell: Thank you very much for having me here Rebecca. Rebecca Fox: You recently wrote in article for you newsletter called Grits and Grease and aside from the obvious what is grist and grease stand for? Dr. Thaddeus Bell: What I was trying to do is, I was trying to show historically a reason not the only reason but a reason why some African American people have difficulty getting away from food that they have been both up on. And I was trying to put in a historical prospective why some African American or what some African American get thought about grits and grease which they were force to eat as a result of being so poor. And when I thought about I got one of my historian friends to look that up to see whether or not that in fact was a fact. And it is— it was the effect that a lot of poor people and always save that this people were PO poor not P-O-O-R but PO poor people back during the day when all they had to eat was grits and grease that came from the kitchen of the slay and this is what a lot of African American people had to eat and as a result over they years they just refund that food and made it taste good so this is where a lot of the pig bit that African Americans eat, a lot of the pork and other bad foods that we know now not nutritious for us but because of our condition from slavery up until the mid 60’s a lot of those kind of foods we had to eat because that’s all we had to eat to survive. So what we did is we took bad food and we made it taste good and now from the historical point we have of African Americans who continue the evils hopes and that’s why it’s a very, very difficult for some African Americans to break away from that tradition as where you know putting the ham hogs in grains and putting all kinds of bad food to give it spice and a lot of people will have – there much difficulty giving away from those kind of foods. So, that’s what the grits and grease thing came from so I thought from time to time in my newsletter that I write on a weekly basis the name of this close in a gap in healthcare. And we have a leadership of about 1500 people and to kind of educate people a kind to write from a different prospective and so that’s where the grits and grease in. I’ve got a lot of feedback and a lot of people did not know it but historically the information that’s in there health tip is correct. Rebecca Fox: This is the fascinating topic for me, what recommendations do you have for people when there is an situation like a family reunion and they are surrounded by all of that food they love, that may be so good. Dr. Thaddeus Bell: Well you know it is going to take a tremendous amount of courage you know to ask what the food was cook in. As a result of improving the health literacy of people, people are becoming aware in asking the tuff questions and some people however one have a grains that are cook with something to make it a very, very tasteful that’s not necessarily healthy for you. And my dad that in my experience they have been a lot of courses that people can take to learn how to cook the all recipes for African American learn how to cook those foods a lot more healthier so. But its still is a loving well, I can tell you when I ask people what about ham, hogs, and what about pig feet, and what about jelling people drop the head and say yes they will eat those kind of things so— Rebecca Fox: This is all about the education? Dr. Thaddeus Bell: It’s all about, it’s all about the education but it has been a part of our value history and that’s

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