ADHD or Something Else Video

This medical tip video from DrMDK gives you tips about ADHD.
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Well, ADD is one cause of children not performing well in school and ADD or ADHD, children that have an immaturity of attention, distractibility, impulsivity and sometimes hyperactivity for their intellectual age and that can hold you back. However, there are different degrees of ADHD and certainly if ADHD is part of the problem, a lot of children don’t necessarily need to be in medication if they have attentional immaturity. Some children just need some structure, a little more consistency both at home and at school, and some help with organizational skills and can sometimes do fine because ADHD even in itself specially when it’s milder gets better and sometimes there’s really no need for medical interventions per se. Children can have problems with school for other reasons. They may have a relative learning disability. Now, a learning disability just means that there’s one part of your brain that doesn’t work as well as everything else and most of us do have some learning disabilities whether it’s acknowledged or not. We’re all weak in one finger. I think there are a very few people that really aren’t. It’s just a question of how weak one is and whether it affects schooling. So a child that has a real learning disability meaning that they’re in the bottom, two kids out of a hundred and that specific task usually requires some intervention in school and extra help, but there are also children that for example, maybe you might have a child that’s very smart, he’s great in English and he’s at the 30%, in other words, most kids are better than him in that per se, and he doesn’t sleep very well. And that child may be staying up all night and maybe really falling apart in math. He would simply just need more sleep and maybe a little bit of tutoring and would really recover from that. So there are a whole bunch of different things that can really impact on a child’s performance in school and they don’t necessarily need to be called a real diagnosis. Even if there is a diagnose, even if there is attention deficit disorder. Children that may have that most actually don’t need medication. Most can be managed by helping them organize theirs who work performance and being consistent and getting a good night sleep and such. There’s a small percentage that we sometimes offer medication too but not most of them. So that could be a whole bunch of different things and there could be multiple factors, a little bit of this and a little bit of that and a little bit of this that can impact from a child’s performance. And many times, we actually intervene and the parents can intervene without doing a lot of medical type things. Male: Or if he likes something, you really don’t want to watch it and that’s true and like in many areas. Steven Pavlakis: That a good question. The question that you’re asking as I understand is if you don’t like something, you don’t do well. So sometimes, parents will come to me and say, “My kid doesn’t like math and he doesn’t do well but he’s really good at math.” Well, the reality of it is there are two possibilities in that, big possibilities in that situation. One could be that his math is really terrible and that’s possible, he doesn’t know how to teach it. That does happen. Another possibility is that the kids are really not great in math because if you’re really good at something, you usually like it. For example, I don’t like soccer. I can’t play soccer. I’m very bad kicking with my feet so I won’t be able to do that so I don’t like soccer, not because it’s not a great sport, it’s just that something I can’t do. The same thing with ballet, I don’t like ballet but I think it’s because I can’t do it not so much so I can’t really get my head around it and get interested in it. So sometimes, it really is a learning issue if the child doesn’t like it because I find that most things you’re really good at, you tend to enjoy and get it at higher levels and enjoy it. So I’m not sure that that’s always an excuse but the

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