Jared C. LaCorte M.D., FAAP, FACC Metro Pediatric Cardiology www.DrMDK.com Medical School: Albany Medical College Pediatric Residency:New York Presbyterian Hospital- Cornell Medical Center Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship: Children's Hospital of Ne...
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Interviewer: We have bunch of kids on medicine for things like attention deficit disorder. Do these drugs increase your risk to the situation like this? Doctor: As far as we know absolutely not. Interviewer: Yes, the 11 Academy, all they have come up recently and said if they are taking medicine for attention deficit, this should have some kind of a cardiac screen. Is that more public relations or more fact? Doctor: I think it is more public relations then in fact the Neurological Society, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association are all sort of states slightly different things may have been come together for real consensus. There was initial report several year ago which may have link these drugs to sudden death. However, many further studies have not proven that to be true. And at this point, it is really just public relations. People have heard about this. People are scared and they want to be check out. The one advantage is that at least we are allowing ourselves to screen a certain percent of the population. As I stated, they are certain people who feel that every athlete should have some type of screening possible with an EKG. So at least this sub group of patient who are on 80 age meds are getting screened and sometimes things are pickup which have absolutely nothing to do with their attention deficit disorder or the medications they are taking. But they have a preexisting condition that any child would have. Interviewer: We agree.

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