Learn how a drug used to treat urinary-tract infections may also be useful for the treatment of Alzheimer's in this medical report.
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This is Insidermedicine in 60. From Scotland - A drug used to treat urinary-tract infections may also be useful for the treatment of Alzheimer's. According to a study from the University of Aberdeen, the drug, which is a formulation of methylene blue, was found to slow the progress of Alzheimer's for up to 19 months. Rather than attacking amyloid plaques, the drug attacks tau, which promotes tangles. However, this was an investigational study and the drug is not currently approved for treatment. From Boston - Secondhand smoke in the home increases the risk of stroke for a non-smoking spouse. In a study of over 16,000 married volunteers, researchers found that, among those who never smoked, but were married to a smoker, there was a 42% increased risk for stroke, compared to non-smoking couples. Among former smokers married to a current smoker, there was a 72% increased risk. And finally back to Scotland - Anti-smoking legislation appears to be reducing the number of hospitalizations for acute coronary syndrome. In a study involving nine Scottish hospitals, researchers found that since smoking was prohibited in enclosed public places the number of admissions for acute coronary syndrome have dropped by 17%. This was compared to a 4% reduction in England, which has no such legislation in place. For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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