A perfectly shaped head and five small fingers. A new technology that allows parents to see their unborn children more clearly than ever before.
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Dr. Dean Edell: Terrie and Matt Burklew aren't just flipping through a few old pictures. Instead, they're thinking about who their new baby girl might look like. Matt Burklew: Oh my gosh, that's easy. Her eyes, without a doubt. They've been called dreamy on more than one occasion. Terrie Burklew: I like all his features. He has a great smile. Dr. Dean Edell: Today, thanks to new technology, Terrie and Matt will get to see who she really does look like and, more importantly, whether or not she's healthy. Matt Burklew: He looks just cute. I can't go beyond that. Dr. Dean Edell: With the new 4-Dimensional ultrasound, parents-to-be can see the face, hands, spine and even brain formation. Vicki Acosta is a medical sonographer who is used to traditional ultrasounds. Vicki Acosta: I remember, when I first started, I could barely make out anything. You would just see a skeleton. Dr. Dean Edell: Here's a regular ultrasound image and the same one using 4-D. Sally Grady: You can look for abnormalities such as a cleft palate or club foot or spina bifida. Dr. Dean Edell: This image shows how clearly a deformity can be detected. Seeing her little girl is problem-free puts Terrie's mind at ease. Terrie Burklew: In the beginning, those thoughts went through my head. What would we do and what would be the problems? And so a lot in the beginning. Not so much now. Dr. Dean Edell: Now, it's just a matter of waiting for the big day. I am Dr. Dean Edell.

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