3-D Help For Heart Video

This medical video looks in the groundbreaking research which has created a beating heart cell that brings us one step closer to repairing damaged hearts.
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Jennifer Matthews: This is Susan Cochran's heart and this is her watching at work. Susan Cochran: Honestly, I'm amazed. I mean, the whole thing amazes me. Jennifer Matthews: What was more amazing to Susan is that she had a heart attack without even realizing it. Susan Cochran: I had not chest pains. None of the normal what you would think symptoms. No shortness of breath. No nothing. Jennifer Matthews: She did have what she though was a gallbladder pain. Her doctor referred her to Duke University, the first hospital in the country to use a MRI to diagnose heart problems. Dr. Robert Judd: One of the important advantages of cardiac MRI over other diagnostic techniques is its ability to determine which regions of the heart are alive, as compared to which regions are dead. Jennifer Matthews: The MRI confirmed she had a heart attack. It also showed that her heart had enough live tissue for a bypass operation. This MRI six months after surgery shows doctors Susan's bypass worked, and Susan's heart is getting healthier. Dr. Robert Judd: For individual patients it means a much more accurate diagnosis and then, of course, it's very important in planning their treatment, either surgical or non-surgical treatment. Susan Cochran: It gives me a lot more confidence. Jennifer Matthews: Susan who loves crossword puzzles has found a new, three-letter abbreviation for healthy heart: MRI. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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