This medical video explores the new treatment of being able to slow down racing hearts for those with an irregular heart beat.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: This small hill seemed more like a mountain to Joella Bassett just a few months ago. This active grandmother suffered from a heart problem that would stop her in her tracks. Joella Bassett: I could be doing anything. It might be even waking up in the morning -- and I'd have this pounding in my chest. Jennifer Matthews: For more than 40 years, Joella lived with a rapid heart beat. Joella Bassett: I thought, 'Why is this happening? I'm not doing anything. I'm not running. I'm not moving. I'm just sitting here.' Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Amar Singh says rapid or irregular heart beats can be dangerous. Dr. Amarnauth Singh: They'll feel skipped beats. They'll feel light-headed. They'll feel dizzy or they may actually lose consciousness. Jennifer Matthews: In the past, to treat an irregular heartbeat, a catheter was inserted into a vein and guided into the heart. The doctor would then have to guess where the problem was. Dr. Amarnauth Singh: We could be off-target somewhat. Jennifer Matthews: Now, a new 3D mapping system pinpoints exactly where the problem is. Dr. Amarnauth Singh: It tells you, 'Here's your catheter; here's your abnormality; move your catheter a little closer.' So it takes out the guesswork. Jennifer Matthews: In less than two hours, doctors can correct the problem. Joella Bassett: I remember when he finally said, 'We have found where the problem is,' and he was so excited. Jennifer Matthews: Joella was able to go home the same day. Joella Bassett: This is so exciting. No more medication; no more interruptions in my lifestyle. Jennifer Matthews: Now Joella can hike with her granddaughters and enjoy the smaller things in life. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement