This health video focuses on how kids today fight the onset of diabetes.
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Jennifer Mathews: There's a lot Nicolle See likes about playing soccer. Nicolle See: Just having fun and like getting exercise. Jennifer Mathews: And it helps her stay healthy. When Nicolle was 6, she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Catherine See: It's just always something. It's always in the back of your mind. Nicolle See: It's hard because you have to remember to check your blood sugar, and you have to remember to give yourself insulin because you sometimes can forget things.. Jennifer Mathews: Now, technology helps kids like Nicolle remember. Dr. Lori Laffel: Technology is one way of bringing something new and different into diabetes care, and it frankly, it does -- it make life easier. Jennifer Mathews: With this PDA device kids can upload blood sugar readings, insulin doses and carbohydrate intake daily. In a study, children who used a PDA along with special software, checked their sugars more often and have lower readings. Dr. Lori Laffel: The more children check their blood sugars, the lower their measure of diabetes control, and lower here is better. This is like a golf game. Jennifer Mathews: Good blood sugar control can save children from complications like blindness, stroke and kidney disease. In another study, Dr. Laffel found children who were sent text message reminders checked their blood sugar more often. Receiving reminders online may also be helpful. Nicolle says, "Technology makes having diabetes a little easier." Nicolle See: It would remind me to check my blood sugar more often, which I can forget, and it's like a funner way. Jennifer Mathews: And it helps kids learn more about their disease, knowledge Nicolle is happy to share. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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