The Best Depression Blogs of the Year

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at bestblogs@healthline.com!

Depression wants to take the joy out of your life, but you don’t have to let it. With proper treatment — from traditional talk therapy to medications and lifestyle adjustments — depression doesn’t have to consume your every day.

There are several forms of depression, anxiety, and mood disorders, and altogether they affect 14.8 million adults in the United States, or roughly 7 percent of the population, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

One way to deal with your depression is to simply acknowledge that it exists, and be open about having it. Take a look at the following inspiring blogs and websites, which do just that.

Beyond Meds

Beyond Meds

There’s certainly a split in the depression community between those who trust modern medication and those who seek mental health treatment using other methods. If you’re in the latter camp, Beyond Meds speaks your language.

Monica Cassani is a self-described critic of the system and of the psychiatric drugs she once used to treat her depression. She offers advice and support for those who wish to treat their mental health issues without pharmaceuticals, and documents the stories of other people who have come off their medication.

Visit the site.

Tweet Monica: @BeyondMeds

Blue Light Blue

Blue Light Blue

Amy Marlow lost her father to suicide and now deals with her own depression and generalized anxiety disorder. On Blue Light Blue, she shares her struggles dealing with suicide loss, and how she has learned to take control and stand tall when it comes to getting her own treatment.

Her posts are incredibly personal and thought-provoking, reflecting not only the pain and trauma she has endured, but also her commitment to not hiding her struggles with mental health. Amy’s open letter to her doctors about what she didn’t get to say as a patient is without a doubt one of the best things on the web.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Amy: @_bluelightblue_

Chipur

Chipur

Bill White has a double view of depression: He’s a mental health professional as well as a man haunted by decades of depression and anxiety. His site, Chipur (pronounced “chipper”), reflects both the internal and external struggles that this can cause.

White’s articles can help you better understand the often confusing arena of mental health, beyond just the usual medication and therapy. He goes after heavy topics, like learning to silence inner demons, the benefits of suffering, and the signs and consequences of self-harm.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Bill: @chipur

Coping with Depression

Coping with Depression

Like many others, Liz Smith was suffering with depression long before she was diagnosed. On Coping with Depression, Liz tackles all the important issues, including distress tolerance, how to incorporate creative activities into therapy, and the important role that language plays when discussing mental health.

Other topics include how to prepare for and survive seasonal depression, how to drown out the noise and focus on what you want when making a life-changing decision, such as parenting, and the beneficial role that animals can play in helping you manage your depression.

Visit the blog.

Daisies and Bruises

Daisies and Bruises

Erin used to believe that life was just a certain way. By age 16, however, she knew that what she was going through had a name. Having gotten the help and treatment she needs, she uses her blog to share her experiences and give others who are dealing with depression the advice and information they need to bring positive change into their lives.

In some of her more recent posts, she’s written about the importance of showing compassion rather than pity, how she is focusing on creativity before perfection, and a recent, difficult, decision to go off her medications in the hope of alleviating her migraines.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Erin: @daisiesnbruises

Depression Marathon

Depression Marathon

Etta was diagnosed with depression 15 years ago, and since then she’s faced everything life had in store for her with the strength and determination of a world-class marathoner.

On her blog, she discusses the benefits physical activity — including running actual marathons — on mood, how to keep yourself from feeling too overwhelmed, and what it takes to keep up the strength needed to remain a “fighter.”

Lately, she’s been posting about avoiding judgment, whether it’s aimed at others or yourself, as well as about sobriety, recovering from injury, and how to deal with past decisions in a positive way.

Visit the blog.

Depression on My Mind

Depression on My Mind

Christine Stapleton is an award-winning investigative reporter who’s also dealt with depression, alcoholism, and bipolar disorder. While it did take some time for her to “get a grip,” she now writes a regular column for PsychCentral.

She gives advice to fellow addicts, including why they should be skeptical of doctors, how mental illness plays into drug addiction, and how antidepressants can relate to relapse. Like her reporting, Stapleton isn’t afraid to look into the dark corners of depression, and her posts are consistently thorough and insightful.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @PsychCentral

Dr. Deb

Dr. Deb

Dr. Deborah Serani, psychologist and practicing psychoanalyst, focuses her blog on trauma and depression, two things that often go hand-in-hand. As an author of several depression-related books, Dr. Deb knows what she’s talking about.

Some of her latest posts include tips to prevent broken heart syndrome, common misconceptions about antidepressant therapy, and tips for getting through the holiday season (which will be back before you know it).

Visit the blog.

Tweet her: @DeborahSerani

Lawyers with Depression

Lawyers with Depression

When you practice law, it’s hard not to let the work get to you. From long hours to tough subjects, it can all begin to weigh heavily on you.

The writer behind Lawyers with Depression, Dan, is a personal injury lawyer who has been living with depression since he was a child, and seen it manifest as sadness, anger, and even physical pain.

His blog posts range in scope and tone, from his own personal stories and coping techniques, to stories about others and how they have learned to live with depression, to practical advice, such as helping readers learn to differentiate between depression and burnout.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Dan: @DanLukasik

My Postpartum Voice

My Postpartum Voice

At My Postpartum Voice, Lauren Hale writes about the challenges, both expected and unexpected, of being a mom, the mental toll that it can take, and how not to get lost in the dark.

Many of her posts are accompanied by postcards with inspiring quotes. Don’t forget to join in on her regular Twitter chats with the hashtag #PPDChat. Like she says, mothers who have postpartum depression should know they’re not alone on their journeys.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Lauren: @unxpctdblessing

Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

Depression is confusing, in no small part because, when you try to wrap your head around it, you are literally asking your brain to understand itself. Pick the Brain, which was launched in 2008 by Erin Falconer, attempts to peel back some of those layers to help give you a better understanding of your condition, and learn ways to improve your situation by focusing on and understanding yourself.

Their easy-to-digest articles focus on getting educated, motivated, and taking action. They include advice on how to rid your life of toxic relationships, the therapeutic benefits of traveling, and the benefits of travel for your mental health.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @PickTheBrain

Postpartum Progress

Postpartum Progress

Thanks to some notable celebrity cases, postpartum depression is finally receiving the attention that it deserves. Founded by Katherine Stone, Postpartum Progress focuses on the unique challenges that mothers — whether seasoned or new — face every day.

Typically the main caregivers to their young children, this blog is a helpful reminder for moms to care for themselves, too. Posts vouch for the importance of research, offer guidance for how to gather information about your condition and find the right treatments, and address specific challenges faced by mothers of different age, socioeconomic status, race, and culture.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Katherine: @postpartumprog

A Splintered Mind

A Splintered Mind

Life gave Douglas Cootey depression as well as ADHD, but it couldn’t take his sense of humor. His website, A Splintered Mind, is a witty, whimsical, and utterly genuine exploration of what it is like balancing both conditions, and how difficult it can be to focus on various tasks when you have ADHD, from writing articles to speaking to groups about mental health.

A Mormon, he’s devoting a series of posts to exploring the links he sees between prayer and mental health. He’s also the author of a book, “Saying ‘No’ to Suicide,” from which he occasionally posts excerpts, including some about cognitive techniques you can use to resist depression and suicidal urges.

Visit the blog.

Tweet Douglas: @SplinteredMind

Students Against Depression

Students Against Depression

College is a common time for mental health issues to manifest. Being away from home, feeling overwhelmed, and other challenges can make depression rear its ugly head pretty quickly.

The bloggers behind Students Against Depression dive head first into the subjects facing them the most: stress, surviving suicidal thoughts, and getting a better understanding of what depression is. In their posts, they talk about their current struggles, celebrate overcoming negative thoughts, and share advice and encouragement.

Visit the blog.

This Is a Depression Blog

This Is a Depression Blog

Michelle is a technical communication student from Canada who suffers from depression, anxiety, and dysthymia, among other conditions. Here, she shares stories about her personal struggles, including the suicide of a friend, and how they affect her mental health, as well as how she’s learned to calm her anxiety.

Most recently, she’s been writing about her current double-whammy situation: depression and unemployment. While it can be easy to put yourself down in such a situation, she’s choosing to not fall into that trap: “The truth is, I’m probably not worthless. You’re probably not worthless either. I’m not sure if I’ve met a person without any worth.”

She’s absolutely right.

Visit the blog.

Time to Change

Time to Change

People with mental health issues are often discriminated against because of the stereotypes associated with it. As the name suggests, the people behind this organization believe it’s time to change that. Their blog is a collection of personal stories written by people with virtually every form of depression.

Some write about how they realized they had depression or how it has impacted their lives, while others talk about the moments they knew they needed help, and how they found it. If you ever need confirmation that you aren’t alone, this is the place to find it.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @TimetoChange

Wing of Madness Depression Guide

Wing of Madness Depression Guide

Wing of Madness may sound like the greatest heavy metal band of all time, but it’s actually a rocking depression site that’s been around since 1995. It focuses on major depressive disorder, the worst of the bunch.

Straightforward in approach and tone, Wing of Madness offers helpful information for the newly diagnosed as well as the latest screening guidelines and other news for those familiar with their diagnosis. One of its most popular posts describes what depression feels like.

Visit the blog.