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The Cost of Epilepsy Medications

Overview

Over the last few decades, the quality of epilepsy and seizure treatments has improved dramatically. New medications are coming to the market each year—but with hefty price tags. These newer treatments tend to be more expensive than older treatments.

If you have seizures or have been diagnosed with epilepsy, you may need to take drugs on a daily basis. Paying for your medication can be a burden, but there are actions you can take to keep costs in check.

Research and learn about your medication. The cost of your drug may vary from one pharmacy to the next. Before you fill your prescription, get price estimates from several pharmacies in your area.

Below, we’ve listed the most common epilepsy prescription drug treatments. We’ve also included links to some online drug pricing sites. Prescription costs may be different in your part of the country, so remember to check prices in your area.

If you need help paying for your medication, you may qualify for a money-saving patient assistance program. Many of these organizations and companies can reduce how much you pay for your drugs.

Pricing the most common epilepsy prescription drugs

The most common drugs for treating epilepsy are anticonvulsants. These drugs are used for treating seizure disorders. Several web sites, including GoodRx.com, DrugPriceInfo.com, and Costco, are good sources for estimating cash prices for the drugs listed below. Keep in mind that generic drugs often cost less than the brand-name versions.

The following prices are the average cost of a one-month supply for each drug. But remember, drug prices change often. These prices also do not include discounts from insurance companies. For the most current pricing, check the above online sites regularly or contact a pharmacy in your area. You can use this list to help you easily compare the more general prices. The drugs are listed alphabetically by brand name.

For other information on these drugs, check out the epilepsy and seizure medications list.

Eslicarbazepine acetate (Aptiom)

$800 for thirty 400-mg tablets of the brand-name version Aptiom

Carbamazepine (Carbatrol)

$130 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the brand-name version Carbatrol
$70 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the generic carbamazepine

Valproic acid (Depakene)

$240 for ninety 250-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakene
$51 for ninety 250-mg tablets of the generic valproic acid

Valproic acid (Depakote)

$350 for ninety 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakote
$75 for ninety 500-mg tablets of the generic valproic acid

Divalproex sodium (Depakote ER)

$380 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakote ER
$180 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the generic divalproex sodium

Phenytoin (Dilantin)

$88 for ninety 100-mg capsules of the brand-name version Dilantin
$65 for ninety 100-mg capsules of the generic phenytoin

Felbamate (Felbatol)

$1200 for ninety 600-mg tablets of the brand-name version Felbatol
$350 for ninety 600-mg tablets of the generic felbamate

Perampanel (Fycompa)

$1400 for 120 4-mg tablets of the brand-name version Fycompa

Tiagabine (Gabitril)

$240 for thirty 4-mg tablets of the brand-name version Gabitril
$150 for thirty 4-mg tablets of the generic tiagabine

Levetiracetam (Keppra)

$450 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Keppra
$44-80 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the generic levetiracetam

Clonazepam (Klonopin)

$150 for sixty 0.5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Klonopin
$35 for sixty 0.5-mg tablets of the generic clonazepam

Lamotrigine (Lamictal)

$350 for thirty 100-mg tablets of the brand-name version Lamictal
$80 for thirty 100-mg tablets of the generic lamotrigine

Pregabalin (Lyrica)

$430 for sixty 75-mg capsules of the brand-name version Lyrica

Primidone (Mysoline)

$800 for sixty 50-mg tablets of the brand-name version Mysoline
$35 for sixty 50-mg tablets of the generic primidone

Gabapentin (Neurontin)

$165-350 for ninety 300-mg capsules of the brand-name version Neurontin
$40 for ninety 300-mg capsules of the generic gabapentin

Oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR)

$380 for thirty 600-mg tablets of the brand-name version Oxtellar XR

Phenytoin (Phenytek)

$140 for ninety 200-mg capsules of the brand-name version Phenytek
$90–0an for ninety 200-mg capsules of the generic phenytoin

Carbamazepine (Tegretol)

$127 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the brand-name version Tegretol
$67 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the generic carbamazepine

Topiramate (Topamax)

$310 for sixty 25-mg tablets of the brand-name version Topamax
$57 for sixty 25-mg tablets of the generic topiramate

Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)

$410 for sixty 300-mg tablets of the brand-name version Trileptal
$150 for sixty 300-mg tablets of the generic oxcarbazepine

Ethosuximide (Zarontin)

$350 for 120 of the 250-mg capsules of the brand-name version Zarontin
$155 for 120 of the 250-mg capsules of the generic ethosuximide

Zonisamide (Zonegran)

$720 for sixty 100-mg capsules of the brand-name version Zonegran
$80 for sixty 100-mg capsules of the generic zonisamide

Clorazepate (Tranxene)

$400 for sixty 7.5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Tranxene
$35 for sixty 7.5-mg tablets of the generic clorazepate

Diazepam (Valium)

$310 for sixty 5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Valium
$25 for sixty 5-mg tablets of the generic diazepam

Phenobarbital

$50 for sixty 64.8-mg tablets of the generic phenobarbital

Factors that affect your price

Prices can change as often as every day. In 2015, drug prices increased by more than ten percent. They also went up in 2013 and 2014. Your drugs may cost more or significantly less than the prices listed here. Many different factors can change a drug’s price, including:

Health insurance

If you have prescription insurance, the price you pay may be dramatically less than the average cost of the drug. In most cases, insurance will cover a portion of the cost after you have met your deductible. An insurance deductible is a set amount you must contribute or pay out-of-pocket before your insurance will start to cover your costs. Even after meeting your deductible, you may be required to pay a portion of the drug’s cost. This portion is called the co-pay or co-insurance. Medicare, Affordable Care Act plans, and health savings accounts all have rules. Learn how your insurance plan works to get the most out of it.

Brand name

Brand-name drugs are often more expensive than their generic counterparts. Also, your health insurance may not cover a brand-name drug when a generic version is available. Check with your insurance provider. When possible, ask for a generic version to reduce your cost.

Discount cards

Some warehouse stores and chain pharmacies offer discounts and incentives to loyal customers. These discounts are provided by the store, not by the pharmaceutical companies. Prices may vary from one store to the next. Ask your pharmacist if they offer any discount programs.

Large pharmacies vs. independent pharmacies

Large pharmacy companies offer many services other than dispensing prescription drugs. You may pay much more to support those services. Check the prices at both large pharmacies and independent pharmacies before you fill your prescription.

New treatments

New treatments are often very expensive. Many insurance plans won’t cover these drugs. If your doctor wants you to try a new medication, check with the drug’s maker to see if you qualify for a reduced cost. Ask your doctor if there is an older, more affordable drug that will work for you.

Availability

All prescription drugs are manufactured. The manufacturers have to get the ingredients, plan production, and ship products to wholesalers. The cost to the manufacturer of these factors and more can affect the price of a drug.

Takeaway

Epilepsy medications vary in how much they cost. Plus, the price of one drug can change from one day to the next. If you’re trying to keep the cost of your medications down, ask your pharmacist if your drug is available as a generic. Shopping around at different pharmacies and contacting your health insurance company can also help you find the most affordable price.

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