While they may be named BReast CAncer susceptibility genes — or BRCA — these genes have been linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Here are five more things you may not know about BRCA and ovarian cancer.

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You may have heard of genes that increase a woman’s chance of getting cancer.

Despite being named the BReast CAncer susceptibility gene — or BRCA — these genes have been linked to an increased risk of many cancers, including ovarian cancer.

Here are five more things you may not know about BRCA and ovarian cancer.

1. Everyone has BRCA genes.

These genes help repair cell damage and maintain normal cell growth.

It’s only when mutated versions of these genes replicate that they may become cancerous. Unfortunately, these malfunctioning genes can be passed down genetically.

2. Different BRCA mutations carry greater ovarian cancer risks.

Besides breast cancer, BRCA abnormalities can also raise a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer.

In women with inherited BRCA1 abnormalities, that risk is between 35 and 70 percent.

For BRCA2 gene mutations, that risk is between 10 and 30 percent by late age.

3. Some groups are at a higher risk of BRCA mutation.

While BRCA mutations are found in people all around the world, people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent have about a 1 in 40 chance of having the mutation.

These mutations are also more common in people from the Netherlands, Iceland, and Norway.

4. Not everyone needs a BRCA test.

New tests of a blood sample can test your DNA for mutated BRCA cells. Since these are rare, not every woman needs to be tested.

Talk with your doctor about your potential risk factors, including a family history of breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancers, and see if a BRCA test is necessary.

5. The pill could help lower your risks.

Studies on women with BRCA mutations and their risk of ovarian cancer are mixed, but an analysis done in 1992 found oral contraceptive use reduced risk by 50 percent.

Oral contraceptive use has been shown to lower ovarian cancer risks the longer women take the pill. Studies show the risk is reduced by up to 12 percent after a year on the pill. After five years, a woman’s risk is cut in half.

There you have it: Five things you may not have known about BRCA and ovarian cancer.

Knowing your BRCA mutation risk can help you and your doctor make better decisions about your health.

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