The Best Cancer Blogs of the Year

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at bestblogs@healthline.com!

According to the American Cancer Society, there are about 14.5 million people living in the United States today who have had a history of some form of cancer. Thanks to advancements in screenings, drugs, and treatments, people are living longer than ever after a cancer diagnosis, and more people are surviving longer after treatments. By 2024, cancer survivors are expected to number 19 million people.

It’s an ordeal shared by many, so if you or a loved one are currently going through cancer treatments, here is our tally of the 15 best cancer blogs of 2016.

Blog for a Cure

Blog for a Cure

“Cancer sucks” isn’t just a factual statement. It’s also the slogan of Blog for a Cure, a network of blogs written by cancer patients and survivors.

And it’s not just about blogging. They allow users to communicate with each other, offering a vital line of support and understanding from people who are undergoing the same trials and tribulations.

After creating a free account, users can create their own blogs, post pictures, and arrange events.

Visit the blogs.

Boyfriend with a Brain Tumor

Boyfriend with a Brain Tumor

Cancer affects more than the person with the diagnosis. This blog is a “record of the sometimes grim, sometimes surreal, sometimes wryly humorous situation” of, well, having a boyfriend with a brain tumor.

Jill — who married that boyfriend in 2012 — continues to write about the trials and tribulations of being a caregiver of someone with cancer.

It’s a must-read not just for caregivers but for anyone whose life has been affected by cancer.

Visit the blog.

Cancer Policy Matters

Cancer Policy Matters

Treating and finding a cure for cancer shouldn’t be a political issue, but in the United States — which spends more on healthcare than any other country in the world — it sadly is.

The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) advocates for keeping tabs on cancer policies in the United States, namely how tax dollars are spent on cancer research. Their regular WCOE (“what caught our eye”) posts can help keep you in the know with minimal effort.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @CancerAdvocacy

Cancerwise

Cancerwise

From the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas, this blog is dedicated to telling the stories of cancer survivors.

Read stories like those of Erica Nowell, a former Ewing’s sarcoma patient who later came back to MD Anderson to work as a nurse practitioner. Other posts spotlight lymphoma and colorectal cancer survivors, a research nurse who went through thyroid cancer, and people currently going through chemotherapy.

Along with personal stories, the blog also provides the latest news on research and clinical trials, advice on how to manage surgery and treatment, and much more.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @MDAndersonNews

Colorado Cancer Blogs

Colorado Cancer Blogs

Brought to you by the University of Colorado Cancer Center, this blog is packed with the latest on news and clinical research on the causes, treatments, and path to a potential cure for cancer.

Get constant updates as in-house oncology experts chime in with analysis and advice on everything from the latest study on prostate cancer to their thoughts on cannabis as a complementary therapy.

With an easy-to-use tab sorting feature, you can find the content you’re looking for, whether it’s patient care, the latest research, or ways to prevent cancer.

Visit the blog.

The CTCA Blog

The CTCA Blog

The Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) are synonymous with comprehensive cancer treatment, but they also keep an informative blog for those seeking expert answers to common questions.

From what to do following a cancer diagnosis, to dealing with the pain associated with it, the CTCA blog covers all the bases of what you may not immediately consider when diagnosed with cancer.

Just as their network of cancer treatment centers is staffed by qualified experts, their nearly 400 blog posts are filled with useful, vetted information. It’s a must-read for anyone whose life is impacted by cancer.

Visit the blog.

Cure Today

Cure Today

Not all cancers are the same, which is why Cure Today’s content is so useful. Their contributors cover a broad spectrum of the cancer field, from new patients to seasoned experts.

Along with regular updates, the website provides valuable insights and resources, from how those with a family history of cancer can help prevent it to what to do when you are newly diagnosed.

Site visitors are welcome to share their story as well, offering a level of connection and catharsis not found everywhere else.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @cure_magazine

The IHC Blog

The IHC Blog

 “I had cancer” is a phrase anyone going through cancer treatments and its side effects hopes to be able to say one day.

IHadCancer is a support community that’s all about facilitating person-to-person communication for people who have or have had cancer in their lives. Their blog covers various topics related to cancer from guest contributors, including “chemo brain,” post-treatment depression, fertility issues, and more. If you’re looking for first-person advice, this is the place to be.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @ihadcancer

The Liz Army

The Liz Army

In July 2008, 29-year-old Liz Salmi was diagnosed with a grade II gemistocytic astrocytoma brain cancer. To put it bluntly: “It sucked,” she writes.

From undergoing numerous surgeries, to watching other brain tumor friends go into hospice care, Liz attacks the subject of cancer like cancer has attacked her brain — unrelentingly.

Now that her father has brain cancer as well, Liz shares the struggles that go with having to digest and deal with that news as well with the refreshingly honest tone she used at her TEDx talk in 2013.

Visit the blog.

Tweet her: @TheLizArmy 

OncoLink

OncoLink

A publication of the University of Pennsylvania, OncoLink always has something new for returning visitors.

From videos about skin care for people undergoing cancer therapies, to a discussion on cancer research spending compared to military spending, to articles on the healing effects that pets can have throughout the whole ideal, this is a valuable resources for people who are seeking answers to an array of questions.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @OncoLinkTeam

Our Cancer

Our Cancer

While being treated for colon cancer in 2005, veteran journalist Leroy Sievers documented his experience in podcasts and blogs for NPR, called “My Cancer.” He passed away in 2008.

Now, his widow, Laurie Singer Sievers, writes the “Our Cancer” blog for Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a powerhouse of cancer research.

Laurie Sievers doesn’t have cancer herself, but she chronicles memories of her husband and friends going through the ordeal. Her warmth, heart, and bravery shines through in her words.

Visit the blog.

SHARE’s Cancer Support Blog

SHARE’s Cancer Support Blog

Founded by survivors of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, SHARE’s focus is to create a network and community of women affected by either condition. They offer a hotline for cancer patients to call, as well as support groups and educational programs.

Their blog tells the stories of their volunteers’ brushes with cancer, distills major breakthroughs in research, and helps those undergoing cancer treatment get a better understanding of what they can expect, even if it’s the unexpected.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @SHAREing

SU2C Blog

SU2C Blog

Stand Up to Cancer’s main goal is to help fund innovative ways of treating, beating, and curing cancer.

Their blog, meanwhile, is filled not just with updates, but survivor stories. Get inspired with posts from Don Konantz, who beat cancer and then competed in the 2015 Ironman Canada triathlon, or actress Lisa Kate David, who offers advice on dating without nipples after surviving breast cancer.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @SU2C

Toom-ah? What Stinkin Toom-Ah!

Toom-ah? What Stinkin Toom-Ah!

In 2010, Jessica Oldwyn was diagnosed with diffuse astrocytoma, a brain tumor that came back aggressively and gave her an eventual death sentence. She’s traveled far and wide for treatments, including some she’s had to snort.

“I want to live. I want to live like most people want a new car, or a baby, or a vacation, or a new house, or a boyfriend, or husband,” she wrote.

Her blog follows not only her journey but offers resources for those who find solace in her writing as she continues to fight for survival against the odds.

Visit the blog.

Well - The New York Times

Well - The New York Times

The New York Times’ coverage of the news has set the standards for content since the gray lady first began. So it should be no surprise that their coverage of cancer isn’t any different.

In typical Times fashion, their “Well” blog tackles tough and controversial subjects, as well as thoroughly researched advice, like how to balance traditional cancer therapies with the potential of help from alternative medicine. They cover the latest research and prevention tips, as well as showcase the stories of unique individuals who are battling cancer themselves.

Visit the blog.

Tweet them: @nytimeswell

Email us at bestblogs@healthline.com to nominate a blog for next year’s list.