Best Adoptee Blogs

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high-quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at bestblogs@healthline.com!

Every year, over 50,000 kids in the United States are adopted through public agencies, and another 415,000 are living in foster care, according to the U.S. Children’s Bureau. Often, however, the narrative of adoption is told exclusively from the side of the adoptive parent.

Blogs like these are changing that. Written by people who have been adopted themselves, these are the stories of what happens to adopted children after the papers are signed.

The Adopted Life

The Adopted Life

The Adopted Life is a blog and website of Angela Tucker, herself an adoptee and advocate for adoptee rights. Her story was the subject of a documentary called “Closure,” which can be found on Netflix. Many of her posts chronicle her journey of discovery as she learned about her birth family, while others cover her adoptive family’s experiences with transracial adoption.

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Adoptee Restoration

Adoptee Restoration

Deanna is a pastor and mother of three grown children, but several decades ago, she was Melanie. Adopted in 1966 in a closed adoption, Deanna was reunited with her mother and siblings in 1993. Now, she writes about adoption, reunification, and the spiritual aspects of being adopted.

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The Declassified Adoptee

The Declassified Adoptee

Amanda Transue-Woolston was adopted in 1985. In 2009, she became “declassified” when she gained access to her adoption papers and was reunited with her birth family. Here, she uses her expertise as a social worker to turn adoption into a social justice topic that should be discussed openly, not treated as mysterious or off-limits.

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Harlows Monkey

Harlow’s Monkey

Jaeran Kim was born in South Korea and adopted by an American family in 1971. Not only is she an adoptee, but she has dedicated her professional life to adoption issues. Her work has been published in anthologies and academic journals. This blog is a great place to learn about adoption activism, especially in how it relates to cross-cultural and transracial adoptions.

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I Am Adopted

I Am Adopted

Jessenia Arias does not have a typical story. As an infant, she was abandoned on a doorstep in New York City. She was abused as a child, spent time incarcerated as a juvenile, and lived all over the world. Sometime raw and other times joyful, Arias has turned a difficult young life into vibrant adulthood, and is sharing it all to help others grow.

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The Lost Daughters

Lost Daughters

Lost Daughters is a writing project involving a community of several adult women ranging in age from their 20s to 60s, who were adopted as children. The goal is to provide a space where adoptees can have their voices and experiences be heard, and connect with others.

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Our Journey to You

Our Journey to You

As an adoptee and an adoptive mother to three, Madeleine Melcher has a somewhat unique perspective on adoption. Many of her posts are directed at adoptive parents, people who also need a community of support. We love that she speaks to this population with honesty and compassion, urging them to be the best parents possible.

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Pushing On a Rope

Pushing On a Rope

Terri S. Vanech is a former journalist and reunited adoptee. Her blog is about her life in general — marriage, parenting, travel — but many of her posts are about life as an adult adoptee. In one recent post, she writes about her first meeting with her natural father, and about the uncertainties that mark her past and her “new normal” even after all of these years.

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Sister Wish

Sister Wish

Meredith was 4 years old when she found out she was adopted. The conversation came after she told her mother that she wished she had a sister to play with. “You have two,” her mother told her, followed shortly after by, “I’m not your real mom.” Now grown and going by Kat, this blogger talks about how that conversation, her troubled relationship with her adoptive mother, and adoption in general shaped her life and who she is today.

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