Advertisement

Medication Administration: Why It’s Important to Take Drugs the Right Way

Introduction

We take medications to diagnose, treat, or prevent illness. They come in lots of different forms and we take them in many different ways. You may take a drug yourself, or a healthcare provider may give it to you.

Drugs can be dangerous, though, even when they’re meant to improve our health. Taking them correctly and understanding the right way to administer them can reduce the risks. Read on to learn the importance of using medication as directed.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Routes

Routes of medication administration

To start, let’s talk about the different ways drugs can be administered. You’re probably familiar with injections and pills that you swallow, but medications can be given in many other ways as well.

Routes of medication administration are described in the table below.

Route Explanation
buccal held inside the cheek
enteral delivered directly into the stomach or intestine (with a G-tube or J-tube)
inhalable breathed in through a tube or mask
infused injected into a vein with an IV line and slowly dripped in over time
intramuscular injected into muscle with a syringe
intrathecal injected into your spine
intravenous injected into a vein or into an IV line
nasal given into the nose by spray or pump
ophthalmic given into the eye by drops, gel, or ointment
oral swallowed by mouth as a tablet, capsule, lozenge, or liquid
otic given by drops into the ear
rectal inserted into the rectum
subcutaneous injected just under the skin
sublingual held under the tongue
topical applied to the skin
transdermal given through a patch placed on the skin
 

The route used to give a drug depends on three main factors:

  • the part of the body being treated
  • the way the drug works within the body
  • the formula of the drug

For instance, some drugs are destroyed by stomach acid if they’re taken by mouth. So, they may have to be given by injection instead.

Training

Training in medication administration

Not all types of medications can be administered at home or by someone without special training. Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers are trained in how to give you medication safely. Administration of medication requires thorough understanding the drug, including:

  • how it moves through your body
  • when it needs to be administered
  • possible side effects and dangerous reactions
  • proper storage, handling, and disposal

Healthcare providers are trained in all of these issues. In fact, many healthcare providers keep in mind the “five rights” when they administer drugs:

  • the right patient
  • the right drug
  • the right time
  • the right dose
  • the right route

Medication errors happen all too often in the United States, even when drugs are given by professionals. In fact, medication errors are the cause of 1.3 million injuries each year. These errors are due to the wrong drug, dose, timing, or route of administration. These “rights” are a starting point in helping to make sure that medications are given correctly and safely.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Dosage and timing

Dosage and timing

For all medications, you should only give the dosage described in the prescription label or other instructions. Dosage is carefully determined by your doctor and can be affected by your age, weight, kidney and liver health, and other health conditions.

For some medications, dosage must be determined by trial and error. For these drugs, your healthcare provider would need to monitor you when you first start treatment. For instance, if your doctor prescribes thyroid medications or blood thinners, you would likely need to have several blood tests over time to show if the dosage is too high or too low. The results from these tests would help your doctor adjust your dosage until they find the one that’s right for you.

To be effective, many medications need to reach a certain level in your bloodstream. They need to be given at specific times, such as every morning, to keep that amount of drug in your system. Taking a dose too soon could lead to drug levels that are too high, and missing a dose or waiting too long between doses could lower the amount of drug in your body and keep it from working properly.

Potential problems

Potential problems

Adverse events, or unwanted and negative effects, can occur with any drug. These effects can include an allergic reaction or an interaction with another drug you’re taking. To help avoid these problems, be sure to tell your doctor about any other medications you’re taking or any times you’ve had an allergy to drugs or foods.

A drug with high risk of adverse effects may be administered only by a healthcare provider. And in some uncommon cases, your healthcare provider may keep you in their facility so they can observe how the drug affects you. If you take a medication yourself, it’s up to you to watch for problems, such as a rash, swelling, or other side effects. If you notice any problems, be sure to let your doctor know.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Takeaway

Talk with your doctor

Be sure to take your medications correctly to get the most out them and to reduce your risk of side effects and other problems. Anyone giving you the drug should follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

Make sure that you understand everything about taking your medication. If you have any questions, talk to your doctor. Some questions you might ask include:

  • I’m not sure how often I should take this medication. Can you explain your instructions more clearly?
  • My nurse gives me my medication now. Can I be trained to give it to myself?
  • I’m having trouble taking my medication. Can a family member or healthcare provider give it to me instead?
  • Are there any side effects I should watch for?
  • What time of day should I take this drug? Or does it matter?
  • Am I taking any medications that this drug could interact with?
Advertisement

Q&A

Q&A

  • Why do I have to be so careful? Why would it matter if I took too little or too much medication?
  • It might matter a lot. Your medication should be safe and effective if you take it according to your doctor’s instructions. However, if you don’t, your drug could do more harm than good.

    For instance, if your doctor prescribes an antibiotic, it’s very important to take every dose as prescribed to keep a certain amount of the drug in your system. You have to take every dose on time, and you must take all of it until the prescription is gone. If you don’t, your infection could get worse and it could stop responding to the drug entirely. It’s very important that you don’t take too little of an antibiotic.

    For other drugs, there’s more risk if you take too much. For instance, opioid pain medications, such as oxycodone or codeine, are dangerous if you take more than prescribed. You could become addicted to the drug or you could overdose and die.

    All medications have risks, so be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions to stay safe and help your medication be its most effective.

    - Healthline Medical Team
  • Answers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.
Article resources
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement