Best Anti-Smoking Videos of 2015

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  • Best Anti-Smoking Videos of 2015

    Best Anti-Smoking Videos of 2015

    Maybe you smoke cigarettes. Or maybe someone you love smokes, or is smoking near you or near to someone else you love (secondhand smoke has been linked to multiple cancers). Even though most of us have grown up in a fairly anti-smoking world, the habit still persists. 

    That’s because smoking is an incredibly hard habit to kick. The World Health Organization points out that nicotine is as addictive as heroin. When you’re doing something very difficult like kicking an addictive drug, you need all the help you can get. You need the care and support of your friends, and your medical team. You might consider a stop-smoking group, or use one of the prescription aids like a nicotine patch or gum. 

    When your resolve lags, have a look at these videos. They will remind you — sometimes with humor, sometimes graphically — why it’s important to quit.

  • CDC: Tips from Former Smokers — Nathan's Ad: Secondhand Smoke and Asthma

    CDC: Tips from Former Smokers — Nathan's Ad: Secondhand Smoke and Asthma

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention know as much as anyone about the risks of smoking, including heart disease, emphysema, and the dangers of secondhand smoke. This short anti-smoking video focuses on a man named Nathan, but here’s the catch: Nathan never smoked. He worked at a casino that allowed smoking, and got sick from exposure. Tips from Former Smokers — Nathan's Ad: Secondhand Smoke and Asthma is the video to turn to when you want to illustrate, for yourself or another, how smoking damages more than the smoker. 

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  • Top 40: Scariest Anti-Smoking Commercials

    Top 40: Scariest Anti-Smoking Commercials

    Smoking is ugly — you’ll see that here, multiplied times 40 commercials. You may have seen some of these ads before. In Top 40 Scariest Anti-Smoking Commercials, smokers age and sicken before your eyes, and the damage caused to their bodies is graphically displayed. Even in a culture steeped in horror movies, these images and notions are frightening. 

    Say you’re not afraid of guts and gore? Check out this scary figure from one of the ads: The average smoker smokes 5,000 cigarettes a year. At about $7 a pack, that’s over $1,700, which could buy a lot of horror movie tickets. 

  • Tips from Former Smokers — Amanda's Story

    Tips from Former Smokers — Amanda's Story

    Tips from Former Smokers — Amanda's Story is the barebones expression of a mother’s guilt and anxiety. Amanda smoked when she was pregnant. She knew it was bad, but thought that somehow she, and her baby, would escape harm. They didn’t. Her baby was born prematurely and spent her first precious days not in her mother’s arms but in an incubator in pediatric intensive care. The CDC points out that the risks of smoking while pregnant include damage to your baby’s lungs and brain. Amanda can tell you it’s not worth it.

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  • 5 Weird Reasons Not to Smoke

    5 Weird Reasons Not to Smoke

    From the team that brings you Crash Course, a series of hundreds of videos on just about every subject under the sun, comes this straightforward and downright funny assessment of smoking effects that you probably haven’t thought of. Enjoy SciShow’s 5 Weird Reasons Not to Smoke and learn how smoking will affect your sex life (they never mentioned male impotence in all those macho cigarette ads back in the day), and can even damage your pets.

  • Every Cigarette Rots You from the Inside Out

    Every Cigarette Rots You from the Inside Out

    Spoiler alert: Don’t watch this video during dinner because it is just plain gross. Every Cigarette Rots You from the Inside Out features a graphic depiction of just that — rotted human tissue rolled up in cigarette papers for your smoking enjoyment. What’s the point of this gore? If you think cigarettes are only bad for your heart and lungs, you’re way off. Smoking cigarettes thins bone tissue and increases chances of cavities and tooth loss, among other proven damage. 

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  • Reducing Smoking Deaths: Is It Rocket Science?

    Reducing Smoking Deaths: Is It Rocket Science?

    Social scientist Linda M. Collins of Pennsylvania State University is not here to show you blood and guts. This TEDx presentation is scary on a whole different level, because it shows how far America still has to go to get people off of cigarettes. Reducing Smoking Deaths: Is It Rocket Science? focuses on the implementation of programs to get people off cigarettes. Ideas are launched, but when they fail, they aren’t improved upon.

    Collins plots a line connecting the success of America’s 1960s commitment to put humans on the moon and our failure to effectively communicate the dangers of smoking. What works? A systematic approach to behavioral interventions that are improved upon and made more affordable over time.

  • Quitting Is Worth It

    Quitting Is Worth It

    Quitting cigarettes is hard. Nicotine gives smokers an addictive rush of good feeling and raises the blood pressure. For just a moment, you feel a little better. But over time, you need just a little more nicotine. And the more you smoke, the worse your body feels, and the sicker you get.

    Smokers need help quitting. They need friends, and they might need medical help to handle addiction and withdrawal. Reach for these videos the next time you’re tempted to reach for a cigarette, and be reminded that all of the hard work of quitting is worth it.

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