HIV/AIDS

11 Best HIV Videos of 2013

  • 11 Best HIV Videos of 2013

    HIV is a serious topic and an even more serious public health threat. What was a death sentence 30 years ago, however, has been downgraded to a chronic medical condition for many patients who have been treated with antiretroviral medications. 

    The following selection of HIV videos contains our wide range of best-of-the-year picks. From staggering statistics and important information about transmission to inspiring personal stories from real-life patients, you’ll laugh, cry, and learn crucial facts about HIV.

  • Treatment Cascade

    Treatment Cascade is a two-minute lesson about HIV/AIDS statistics. The brightly colored animation delivers some hard facts, including how many people are infected with HIV every year in the U.S. (50,000), how many of them are in treatment (66 percent), and who is sticking with treatments (37 percent). The what-ifs of this video may inspire you to help improve the “treatment cascade.”

  • My Experience: Living With HIV

    KenLikesBarbie, a blogger and HIV advocate, works at an HIV nonprofit organization and is HIV-positive himself. This well-spoken young man shares a frank, abbreviated version of his “finding out I’m positive” story. Surprisingly, he doesn’t blame the partner who infected him. He encourages others to get tested: as Ken says, “knowledge is the most important tool in prevention.” Everyone can learn about handling a potentially devastating situation with grace and humility from My Experience: Living With HIV.

  • How I Found Out I Was HIV Positive

    How I Found Out I Was HIV Positive is another deeply personal, real-life story. The 38-minute film’s subject, Patrick, tells his emotional story of coming out to his father and learning that he’s HIV-positive. His bravery is admirable; he advises the viewer to “listen to your body” if you don’t feel like yourself—something everyone should heed.

  • Fire With Fire

    Director Ross Kauffman’s mini-film Fire With Fire features the story of a courageous little girl named Emma, and is nothing short of awe-inspiring. Emma is dying from leukemia and is in a clinical trial considered to be a last resort by her doctors. Scientists have re-engineered the HIV virus “so it can’t cause disease anymore” and inject it into cancer-riddled T cells to kill tumor cells. The experiment works, and now Emma is healthy. The science behind how viruses work will amaze you; the emotion conveyed by Emma’s oncologist will have you tearing up too.

  • Our Voices – Young People and HIV

    Based on real-life stories, Our Voices – Young People and HIV, sponsored by Youth LEAD, describes the challenges of being young, including a teen’s first romantic relationship and the decision whether or not to do drugs. It’s hard to make wise choices without guidance, and young people with HIV experience discrimination and stigma. The message of the film is to be brave, empower yourself, and reach for your dreams.

  • Truth | HIV/AIDS Awareness

    Truth | HIV/AIDS Awareness says so much without a single word of spoken dialogue. This powerful video from R3bel Films tells the familiar boy-meets-girl tale interspersed with a young woman’s reaction to devastating news. As the story unfolds, accompanied by a somber piano score, statistics flash on the screen about annual HIV infection rates, the number of people living with AIDS, and how many people die from the condition each year. The film indicates that African Americans are highly affected by HIV, and stresses early detection and treatment.

  • HIV Awareness (DelawareHIV.org)

    This video offers a short message from the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services about HIV awareness. It will tug on the heartstrings of anyone who’s wanted to start a family. An infected partner’s viral load is undetectable. A young couple can safely try to have the baby they’ve yearned for. The message is encouraging: “treatment makes life possible.” There can, indeed, be a happy ending for people living with HIV.

  • How HIV Treatment Works

    How HIV Treatment Works is produced by Body & Soul, a UK-based organization for HIV support. The focus of the video is to educate people about the basics of HIV treatment. Emphasis is placed on the goals of HIV medications and the importance of staying in treatment. Presented in a cheery animation with plain language, this video breaks down a complicated subject into easy-to-understand information.

  • The HIV Hop

    Laughter may be the best medicine, and you’ll certainly find yourself laughing through The HIV Hop. MC HIV-HOP and friends rap about the (inaccurate) thought that “kissing, hugging, sharing drinks” can give you HIV. The rapper sets the record straight by the end of the song with the “reality check” about modes of transmission. The humor is irreverent and sometimes crude, but it catches your attention and presents true, need-to-know information.

  • We Can Stop HIV

    We Can Stop HIV is sponsored by the Terrence Higgins Trust for HIV Prevention England. One of the goals of this public service message is encouraging people to have an HIV test. According to the video, one in four men with HIV in the UK don’t even know they have the condition. Colorful line drawings keep the viewer’s attention.  The catchphrase “it starts with me” emphasizes each person’s responsibility to stopping the spread of HIV.

  • I’m HIV-Positive… Now What?

    Personal stories about any type of challenge are compelling, and this one is no different. I’m HIV Positive... Now What? shows a young man’s path to learning whether or not he has HIV. The viewer literally follows the filmmaker to the clinic where he’ll get his HIV results. Using artistic features such as wide letterboxing, captions, and double-speed filming, the viewer learns that Josh is HIV-positive. His inspirational message that “you can still be you” shows that he won’t let this news break him.

  • HIV Doesn’t Discriminate

    HIV doesn’t discriminate when it comes to age, gender, or sexual orientation. This group of films shows that knowledge is the key to reducing the number of active infections, and treatment is important to stay healthy. If you or someone you love may have been exposed to HIV, get tested so you know your status.

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