The Best HIV/STD Health Blogs of the Year

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  • The Best HIV/STD Blogs

    The Best HIV/STD Blogs

    Learning you have HIV or another STD is a life-altering event. That’s why so many patients, and those who love them, turn to blogs to find a sense of connection and to keep up with the latest news. Some blogs offer deeply personal perspectives, while others delve into the latest research and treatments on the horizon. You’ll stumble upon forums, reference materials, and even a few laughs along the way.

    Click through the slideshow for a glimpse into some of the most innovative HIV/STD blogs of 2014.

  • NEJM Journal Watch: HIV and ID Observations

    NEJM Journal Watch: HIV and ID Observations

    Hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Society, HIV and ID Observations has been providing news and information about HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases since 2008. Dr. Paul E. Sax is the blog’s contributing editor. Sax is also a Harvard Medical School professor of medicine and clinical director of Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s HIV program and Division of Infectious Diseases.

    Without revealing names or identifying details about actual patients, Sax is able to provide valuable insights into antiretroviral therapies, the primary type of HIV treatment. This is the go-to blog for thoughtful commentary on HIV and infectious diseases.

  • HIV/AIDS Blog Central

    HIV/AIDS Blog Central

    Sometimes, you just need to hear from other people living and working with HIV/AIDS. The team of bloggers behind HIV/AIDS Blog Central comes from a variety of backgrounds to share personal stories and remind readers that they’re not alone.

    The newly diagnosed can find tips and coping mechanisms from people who actually have been there. Blog posts tackle the serious nature of HIV/AIDS with a healthy dose of inspiration and even a dash of humor. That’s because this blog’s focus is on living with HIV/AIDS.

  • The STD Project Blog

    The STD Project Blog

    The tagline for the STD Project Blog is, “A Positive Voice,” and it’s that positivity that will make you want to continue stopping by. Jenelle Marie, the site’s founder and executive director, strives to remove the stigma surrounding STDs. She chooses to interpret an STD as an unexpected curveball rather than the end of the world.

    Interviews, news, and a forum where you can participate in active discussions and ask questions are just a click away. 

  • Poz.com

    Poz.com

    Poz.com bloggers are an eclectic group, coming from all walks of life to share their real-life stories. This site is packed with practical information for the newly diagnosed and those who have been living with HIV/AIDS for a long time. Fact sheets, news from around the world, and community forums make Poz.com a valuable resource that you’ll want to bookmark and share.

  • Justin’s HIV Journal

    Justin’s HIV Journal

    In his blog Justin's HIV Journal, Justin B. Terry-Smith shares the details of his personal experience as a gay man living with HIV. An HIV activist since 1999, Justin believes his is a story that must be told. Terry-Smith’s goal is to help educate people about the dangers of having unprotected sex. To do that, this blog chronicles his life and the reality of living with HIV. That doesn’t mean it’s all gloom and doom. Justin is eager to share the good times with his readers too. 

  • My Journey with AIDS…and More!

    My Journey with AIDS…and More!

    There’s nothing like a first-hand account to help you understand. Kenn Chaplin has survived more than one AIDS-related illness since he was diagnosed in 1989. His blog, My Journey with AIDS, touches upon the many dramas and diversions of life with HIV/AIDS. Chaplin also supplements his blog posts with updates via Facebook and Twitter, and he encourages readers to comment and join the conversation.

  • Shawn and Gwenn

    Shawn and Gwenn

    Is there such a thing as love after HIV? Definitely. Shawn and Gwenn will be the first to tell you that. Theirs is the story of a boy, a girl, and a virus, and they tell it with refreshing honesty and a touch of humor. Shawn and Gwenn strive to educate and empower others about sexual health. Sprinkled with videos and lively writing, this blog addresses the serious and the silly in entertaining style.

  • Hep B Blog

    Hep B Blog

    The Hep B Blog is a natural fit for the Hepatitis B Foundation, one of the most trusted sources of hepatitis B information. The nonprofit is dedicated to finding a cure for hepatitis while improving the lives of those affected.

    This blog covers a variety of topics, including news from around the world and the latest advances in research. Even better, it will all come directly to your inbox when you sign up for the newsletter.

  • Living in the Bonus Round

    Living in the Bonus Round

    “I was supposed to die, but I wrote a musical instead,” writes Steve Schalchlin. That sentence just about sums up his approach to Living in the Bonus Round. Steve has been writing about his HIV/AIDS status since 1996. What began as a sort of a “death watch” diary has morphed into a positive, uplifting tale of a man given more time than he expected. This is what happens when you take advantage of the bonus round.

  • Go Ask Alice

    Go Ask Alice

    Chances are that if you have a question regarding sexually transmitted infections (STIs), Go Ask Alice can answer it. This interactive site is produced by Alice! Health Promotion at Columbia University, a division of Columbia Health.

    While it certainly can’t take the place of medical advice supplied by your own doctor, Go Ask Alice can provide accurate, reliable information about STIs. Simply browse the question library. If you can’t find the answers you seek, click on the Ask Alice icon and ask your question anonymously and without fear of embarrassment.

  • HCV Advocate News & Pipeline Blog

    HCV Advocate News & Pipeline Blog

    The aptly-named HCV Advocate News & Pipeline Blog focuses on the latest information about the hepatitis C virus. Topics include clinical trials, treatment, and co-infections. The blog also breaks down the important points of the most recent research. You’ll also find out what lawmakers are doing to help — or hinder — advocacy efforts. Editor-in-Chief Alan Franciscus encourages readers to post comments or ask questions.

  • Blog.AIDS.gov

    Blog.AIDS.gov

    The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services manages Blog.AIDS.gov. This is the place to read about the HIV/AIDS policy and program efforts of federal agencies. The site focuses on media tools to get the word out about prevention, testing, treatment, and research.

    In addition to its own postings, the blog features cross-postings from various governmental health agencies, as well as guest posts. But it’s not a one-way street — the public is encouraged to engage in conversation. This is a must-visit blog for activists and advocates.

  • I’m Still Josh

    I’m Still Josh

    If you’re looking for some positivity, ImStillJosh.com should do it. Social media HIV activist Josh Robbins doesn’t let HIV stop him from living well. He’s got a lot to say to the newly diagnosed, and he encourages other long-term survivors to share their wisdom as well.

    This active and vibrant blog is populated with photos, videos, and links to Josh’s many social media outposts. I’m Still Josh is down to earth and informative, but you’ll enjoy its uplifting vibe.

  • Volttage Buzz

    Volttage Buzz

    Discrimination against HIV-positive people can make it hard to connect with the community. But VolttageBuzz.com aims to change all that. The site focuses on gay and bisexual men, but all visitors are welcomed to this blog with a stigma-free attitude.

    News, opinion, politics, and fun mingle together to hit all the hot topics of the day. Suggestions and guest contributions are invited on this blog with a healthy attitude.

  • Poz+ Life of Patrick

    Poz+ Life of Patrick

    Patrick Ingram wants the world to know what HIV-positive people go through. He wants to be there for others with HIV, and he wants to prevent others from making some of the mistakes he has made. Put it all together and you’ve got the Poz+ Life of Patrick.

    Only 25 years old, this young activist has dedicated his life to health education and social justice. The blog’s tagline, “Positivity is everything,” is always the underlying theme, and no matter how serious the topic.

  • My Fabulous Disease

    My Fabulous Disease

    Mark S. King, the blogger behind My Fabulous Disease, has been living with HIV since 1985 and doesn’t hesitate to speak his mind. Are people with AIDS suicide bombers? Did “patient 0” get a bum rap? Why do we need national conference on HIV criminalization? You would be hard-pressed to find insightful commentary on topics like these anywhere else. And that’s what makes My Fabulous Disease worth your time.

  • Sean Strub’s Blog

    Sean Strub’s Blog

    Sean Strub's Blog tackles tough issues like HIV criminalization, stigma, and the state of HIV/AIDS treatment. It’s a great companion to his memoir, “Body Counts: A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS, and Survival.”

    Strub has been HIV positive for 33 years, and has been an HIV/AIDS activist since the mid-1980s. He continues on his quest to raise awareness of the many facets of life with HIV.

  • A Marine and HIV

    A Marine and HIV

    The blog A Marine and HIV follows the life of a marine who learned he was HIV positive through his pre-deployment blood screening. This blog opens a meaningful window into the world of one man living with HIV. It touches upon the deepest human emotions we all have but seldom share.

    Though it’s only one man’s story, it’s not an uncommon one. Reading his account can help you realize that you’re not alone, and that there’s a way to tap into the strength we all have within.

  • Ending the Stigma

    Ending the Stigma

    As you peruse these blogs, certain themes keep popping up: stigma, discrimination, and social justice. Living with HIV/AIDS/STDs starts with a physical diagnosis, but there’s more to it than that. Unfounded fears and ignorance continue to hinder progress and tear people apart. We need activists and bloggers like these to keep whittling away at injustice while providing understanding about these diseases and the people who live with them.

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