Allergies

Apps That Can Save Your Life

 
   

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  • Apps for Allergies

    A device that could save your life—smartphone apps are so much more than games these days. They can help you avoid food allergens, teach you how to administer epinephrine, direct you to the nearest emergency room, and help first responders get your medical history if you ever have an anaphylactic reaction and can’t respond. Here are the ones you should consider downloading. 

    Please note: Healthline Networks does not endorse or warrant for  fitness of purpose any of these applications. These apps have not been  evaluated for medical accuracy by Healthline Networks and unless  otherwise indicated, haven’t been approved by the Federal Drug  Administration (FDA).

  • Noshed It

    iPhone
    Free

    Noshed It combines the mapping database of FourSquare with the social sharing of Twitter and Facebook. Other users with food allergy constraints can share their favorite (and least favorite) dishes for people with the same food allergies. Pick a restaurant based on reviews, or find other customers’ favorites at the restaurant your friends picked.

  • Allergy Caddy

    iPhone
    $1.99

    Road trips can be a big hazard for people with food allergies. You need to eat, but you may be in an unfamiliar restaurant. Allergy Caddy can help you there—it has allergen guides for 40 of the country’s biggest chain restaurants, including California Pizza Kitchen, Arby’s, KFC, and McDonald’s. Know on the go what’s safe for you to eat and what you should avoid.

  • Allergy Eats

    iPhone and Android
    Free

    Some restaurants warmly welcome food-allergic customers, and some are not so cooperative. Peer-based feedback on this app allows you to see how well a restaurant accommodates customers with special dietary needs so you know whether you need to keep rolling on down the road or stop and sit for a while.

  • Don’t Eat That

    iPhone
    $1.99

    Ingredients labels can be tricky for even the most seasoned allergen hunter. If your allergy is new or you just can’t remember if people with a milk allergy should avoid whey (answer: they should), this app can help you define more than 1,900 food additives and ingredients. Save yourself the heartache, and search your smartphone so you don’t go home with something you’ll just have to throw out.

  • Anaphylaxis

    iPhone
    Free

    The name says it all: People with a history of anaphylaxis need this app. You can create and store your allergy management plan—including a list of your specific allergens, what medicines you take and how much, who should be contacted in the event you have a reaction, and instructions on giving you medicine if you’re having a reaction—at the touch of a finger. Plus, you can set a reminder to replace your epinephrine auto-injector before it expires.

  • EMNet finder

    iPhone and Android
    Free

    Though it’s an app created by Massachusetts General Hospital, this app can help you locate the closest emergency room anywhere in the country. The app uses your phone’s GPS capabilities and allows for one-click transition to driving directions. If you’re in a new place or visiting somewhere and you need to get emergency medical attention fast, this gets you there.

  • Hospital Finder

    Android
    Free

    Don’t be left guessing and driving in the dark if you have any emergency. Find the hospital nearest you quickly. Some hospitals even provide first-aid tips.

  • ICE Standard – The Emergency Standard Card App

    iPhone and Android
    Free

    For people with medical conditions, including severe allergies, carrying a medical identification card with you at all times is important. It can save your life if you’re ever sick and unable to respond to medical personnel. In the digital world, a card on your phone can be useful, too. This app stores your medical history, emergency contacts, medical insurance information, your blood type, your name and address, and a photo for identification purposes so first responders or emergency room personnel can quickly learn about you.

  • First Aid by American Red Cross

    iPhone and Android
    Free

    It’s always good to keep first aid information in hand. This app from the American Red Cross hosts a collection of videos, interactive quizzes, and step-by-step advice that can help you treat medical events from anaphylaxis to a heart attack. Great for people with food allergies in the event of an exposure, but this app could be useful for many other instances, too.

  • Methodology

    We selected these allergy apps based on their potential to aid people with food allergies and their loved ones in a number of ways. Additional factors considered in selecting these apps included: user ratings, affordability, accessibility, format, functionality, and relevance to allergies and its community's needs. Together, this collection represents the gamut of helpful iPhone and Android apps that are successfully designed to make life with food allergies more manageable.

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