Porn Industry Moratorium

The Free Speech Coalition (FSC), an adult film industry trade group, announced that another performer has tested positive for HIV during a mandatory two-week Performer Availability Screening Services-certified testing for sexually transmitted infections.

The actor is now working with doctors to determine whether the larger talent pool was affected. Meanwhile, the U.S. pornography industry remains under moratorium.

The FSC also said all actors who had been in first-hand contact with the infected person have been notified and are undergoing re-testing. The name of the latest performer to test positive was not released under federal health privacy laws.

“We want to remind those who would point fingers—either at the performer or his or her work—is that HIV is a virus, not a moral issue,” FSC representatives said in a statement. “It affects all people, and all populations, and occupations; all of them deserve compassion.”

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Moratoriums Spark Condom Debate

This is the U.S. pornography industry's third moratorium this year following an actor testing positive for the HIV virus. 

In September, actors Cameron Bay and her real-life partner Rod Daily tested positive for the virus and spoke out about conditions inside the pornography industry. Bay told the Huffington Post that there were numerous chances to use a condom onscreen, but she declined, trusting the HIV screening systems in place.

FSC said Bay’s and Daily’s infections were determined to have occurred offsite.

In January, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa signed a law requiring condoms in all pornography filmed within city limits. Since then, pornography production in the area has dropped by 95 percent, according to the Los Angeles Times.

One of the filming sites at the center of the previous moratorium was Kink.com, a San Francisco-based porn production facility.

The FSC said that despite rumors, the newly-infected actor did not work with Bay, Daily, or at the Kink site.

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