Healthline Blogs

Teen Health 411
Teen Health 411

Condoms Prevent STDs: Duh!

TEXT SIZE: A A A
A recent study reported in the American Journal of Public Health (2007; 97(6):1090-1095) found that adolescents who use condoms the first time they have sexual intercourse are less likely to have chlamydia and gonorrhea seven years later, and were no more likely to have more sexual partners than adolescents who did not use condoms at first intercourse.

The study including more than 4,000 teenagers who completed interviews about their sexual behavior over a 6-to-8 year period. Participants were also tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea seven years into the study. Of those teens who were sexually active during the study, 62% reported using a condom the first time they had sexual intercourse and those who used a condom were half as likely to have a sexually transmitted disease seven years later. All sexually active teens reported approximately five different sexual partners during that 6-to-8 year period.

These results support, as health change behavioral theory would suggest, that teens who protect themselves with condoms the first time they have sex, are more likely to maintain healthy, STD and pregnancy preventing habits through their teen and young adult lives. With sexually transmitted infection and pregnancy rates being the highest among 15-25 year olds, it is extremely important that parents, teachers, and peers encourage teens to protect themselves and "not just let sex happen."

Photo Credit: celebdu

  • 1
Was this article helpful? Yes No
Advertisement

About the Author

Dr. Brown is a developmental psychologist specializing in adolescent health.

Advertisement
Advertisement