Oh, Crumbs!
Oh, Crumbs!

Self-proclaimed font of Celiac knowledge, Libby tries to educate everyone she comes across on the differences between allergies, gluten sensitivity, and Celiac Disease.

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Raise a Glass for National Celiac Awareness Day

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Happy National Celiac Awareness Day, everyone! What could be more appropriate than to celebrate with friends and a few cold ones?
I was going to review gluten free beers, but mid way through writing that post, I decided instead to recommend something that is naturally gluten free. I believe it better to commemorate this special day with an item that has been historically safe for Celiacs to drink, and not to mention a favorite beverage of my home country, England.
Cider, sometimes confused with sparkling apple juice by many of my friends, is an alcoholic beverage fermented from fruit juice and can contain anywhere from 2% to 9% ABV. Usually made from apples, this delicious drink is perfect for Celiacs and gluten intolerants as a beer alternative. Here are three must have ciders made by one maker that I highly recommend to all responsible drinkers out there.
My three favorite ciders are made by Crispin. The Honey Crisp, The Saint, and the Lansdowne cider are each so drinkable, yet so diverse in ?avor that you can always ?nd an occasion to drink one. All under Crispin’s Artisanal Line of ciders, these beverages are bubbly and refreshing, but without that taste of Jolly Rancher candy that many other apple ciders hold. It is hard to enjoy a drink that is too sweet, which is why these three Crispin ciders are the perfect blend of tradition and ?avor -- without all the sugar.
The Honey Crisp is un?ltered, which means it is cloudy. Made with organic honey, it is a little sour and a little sweet, and reminds me of being a child eating apple slices with honey drizzled over the top.
The Saint is also an un?ltered, cloudy cider, but unlike the Honey Crisp, this one touches on beer traditions. It is made with Belgian Trappist Yeast mixed with organic maple syrup. It is full of ?avor and the maple is surprisingly subtle through the whole bottle. This Belgian style of cider harks back to the Trappist monks who brew beers of the highest quality.
The Landsdowne is my favorite of the ciders. Brewed with Irish Stout Yeast, this beverage is rich and dark. And with the added molasses, it almost feels creamy and thick while drinking it. It is also un?ltered and cloudy, and though it is the most delicious of the ciders, it takes the longest to drink because it is very heavy.
My word of warning to Celiacs out there who want to drink cider: make sure you do not drink too many, or at least hydrate yourself. Due to the high sugar content of the apple juice, this drink makes for one terrible hangover the next morning!
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Libby educates everyone on food allergies, gluten sensitivity, and Celiac Disease.

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