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Get Wicked Safe this Halloween

Most Americans with children participate in Halloween celebrations. For the most part, the worst thing that happens is a few tummy-aches and few grey hairs. Still, Halloween can offer up some menacing goblins if you aren’t careful. For Halloween Safety Month children and adults might want to heed to some healthful trick-or-treat advice.

Here are some tips from the National Safety Council and the Prevent Blindness Association:

  • Select fire retardant costumes with some reflective tape
  • Use a flashlight and only enter areas that are well-lighted
  • Forgo the spear and swords and any other sharp objects
  • Choose masks that provide clear vision, don’t endanger the eyes and allow for good ventilation, or better yet use makeup
  • Test make-up before applying and use non-toxic hypo-allergenic cosmetics to avoid allergic reactions
  • Supervise kids under 12 and send kids off with ID in case they get lost or hurt
  • Create a planned route on sidewalks and foot paths
  • Instruct kids not to dart out between cars and to walk against the traffic
  • Set a curfew
  • Tell kids not to eat any treats until you have check the goods first
  • Throw out any unwrapped candy
  • Buy a new toothbrush to encourage healthy tooth care
  • Keep pathways to your home obstacle and fire hazard free
  • Remove choking hazards (brush up on the Heimlich maneuver in case choking occurs)
  • Serve and drink only pasteurized apple cider to avoid salmonella poisoning
  • Don’t use decorative contact lenses
  • Explain the difference between a prank and vandalism
  • If your child has diabetes, follow these guidelines from the American Diabetes Association

Just in case, here is what you should have on hand in your first aid kit.

Happy Halloween!

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