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Survivors' Viewpoints on Communication Importance

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As I mentioned in my posting on January 21, 2007 my father, a retired physician, and I are writing a book for all patients and family members on communicating with your health care provider (physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant). We are blessed to have such a wonderful project to work on together and fantastic publisher (Jones and Bartlett Publishers).

We would be very interested in any information/comments any cancer survivors’ and/or family members would provide for us. We would appreciate your comments on:

1) problems you have had communicating with your health care provider, and
2) what examples do you have of effective communication with your health care providers, and/or
3) what would you like health care providers to do differently to communicate with you?

You are welcome to put this in the comment section of this post with your name or without your name. We would appreciate this information because we have been asking individuals around the country but have NOT specifically addressed cancer survivors. I think it would be helpful to see if the input provided by cancer survivors’ and their family and friends is similar or different than other individuals who do not or have not had cancer. If you do not feel comfortable making a comment on this blog you may send an email to: crking@maknaus.com. We may not be able to reply to each comment or message but I can assure you each one will be read carefully and evaluated as to whether it has been covered in the book or needs to be added

This book is designed specifically to help anyone needing healthcare to be able to advocate for his/herself or family and friends. This is a way of putting the focus of healthcare back where it belongs - "on the patient and family".

P.S. The image is of the 2nd edition of another book I published with Jones and Bartlett Publishers on Quality of Life.

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About the Author


BA, MPH

Steve shares what he learned from his personal experience with cancer.

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