Restless Leg Syndrome Assessment

Learn more about whether or not the symptoms you are experiencing may be Restless Leg Syndrome


About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Introduction: Restless Leg Syndrome On Screen: Dr. Danielle Geraldi-Samara: Board Certified Neurologist Dr. Geraldi-Samara: Restless Leg Syndrome is a very common neurologic disorder and it is on the spectrum of what we call movement disorders. About 10 years ago there was an international RLS study that was conducted. Out of that study came a rating scale. It is a scale based on zero to 40; with zero being no symptoms that are referable to RLS and 40 being the most severe syndrome. Now, this is very important to us as neurologists because it gives us a tool by which we can diagnose RLS and also it helps us assess the severity in a patient in which we have already diagnosed the syndrome.

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Time of Day

Are these feelings more persistent in the evening hours? 

Do you notice these feelings more in the evening? RLS symptoms typically occur or are more pronounced in the evening. That does not mean that the symptoms occur only in the evening. There are very many patients who do experience some degree of discomfort during the daytime, but it tends to be mild and maybe intermittent; whereas the symptoms are across the board more pronounced at night time.

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Relief in the Morning

Does this need to move your arms or legs often go away when you first wake up or do you experience relief in the morning hours?

Does the need to move your arms and legs go away when you first wake up in the morning? In general, the symptoms of RLS are absent in the morning so when you get up, get out of bed and start your daily routines, start walking around, it would be very rare for RLS symptoms to present at this time of the day

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Sleep and Rest

Do you find that these feelings are triggered or more noticeable when you’re at rest, sleeping, or attempting to sleep?

Is the need to move your arms and legs more intense when you are at rest? RLS symptoms are typically more intense at rest but I have had many patients report that while they are walking around they do feel that creepy crawly or tingling sensation in the legs. But again, across the board, they are typically more pronounced while at rest.

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Relief with Movement

Does this need to move your legs or arms lessen or disappear completely after walking or moving your arms?

Does the need to move your arms and legs around go away when you actually move? This is a key question, again, because this is kind of the whole mark of RLS. There should be some degree of relief, whether it is temporary, whether it is partial, whether it is intermittent. Pretty much everyone with true RLS experiences some relief when they move in some sense. Again, if there is absolutely no relief with movement this calls into question the diagnosis of true RLS and your practitioner should look to evaluate for other causes of unpleasant or disturbing sensations in the legs or in the arms.

About Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. Danielle Geraldi-Samara, M.D. is a board certified neurologist at the Park Slope Family Health Center in New York.

Arms and Legs

Have you experienced a strong or overwhelming sensation to move your arms or legs when seated or lying down?

Have you ever experienced a strong or overwhelming sensation to move your arms or legs around when seated or lying down? This can manifest as a number of different things. Some people feel the urge to kick. Some people feel the urge to stretch, to walk around, to kind of stomp it out or to shake their legs out. Some people feel the need to rub their legs. When we say seated or laying down, I want to clarify that we mean any time that you are really at rest.

Table of Contents
  • Introduction

    This assessment a tool that can help be used to help diagnose Restless Leg Syndrome.

  • Time of Day

    Do you notice these feelings more in the evening?

  • Relief in the Morning

    Does this need to move your arms or legs often go away when you first wake up or do you experience relief in the morning hours?

  • Sleep and Rest

    Is the need to move your arms and legs more intense when you are at rest?

  • Relief with Movement

    Does this need to move your legs or arms lessen or disappear completely after walking or moving your arms?

  • Legs and Arms

    Have you experienced a strong or overwhelming sensation to move your arms or legs when seated or lying down?

Below are the results from your assessment. Talk to your doctor about next steps in your recovery process.

Your RLS Assessment Results:

Yes. Based on your answers, the symptoms you're experiencing should be brought to the attention of a doctor.

Take this assessment with you and discuss your condition with your general practitioner or an RLS specialist. You can learn more about RLS, its causes, possible treatments, medication, and more in our RLS Learning Center.

Your RLS Assessment Results:

No. Based on your answers, it seems unlikely that you're experiencing symptoms associated with RLS

However, if you condition worsens, take this assessment with you and discuss your condition with your general practitioner or an RLS specialist. You can learn more about RLS, its causes, possible treatments, medication, and more in our RLS Learning Center.


Tell us what you think about the assessment. Take the survey. More information about condition here. This content is for informational purposes only and should not be considered medical advice, diagnosis or treatment recommendations. Visit our terms of use here.

Next Steps:

Print or email a copy of your results
to discuss with your doctor.