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Assessing Your RA Treatment: Is Your Condition Under Control?

Find out if your symptoms of RA pain, swelling, and flare-ups are indicators that your condition is getting worse or advancing.

woman with ms holding her hands

Overall, are your RA symptoms of flare-ups, including pain, stiffness, and inflammation, worse than they were three months ago?

woman with morning stiffness

Are your symptoms of fatigue and morning stiffness, worse than they were three months ago?

knee pain

Are you experiencing RA symptoms (pain, swelling, or stiffness) in new or different joints?

woman with lower back pain

Rate your ability (1-3) to pick up your child or carry common items (like a laptop computer) across the room.

man unable to get up out of bed

Rate your ability (1-3) to get up from a chair, get out of bed, or get out of a car.

unable to type

Rate your ability (1-3) to type on a computer keyboard or use a smart phone or tablet.

man with nausea after taking ra medication

Do you experience stomach problems or nausea after taking your RA medication?

woman with fatigue

Do you feel tired or fatigued the day of (or the day after) you take your RA medication?

ra medication

Do you feel like you're doing well with your current RA medication?

different types of ra pills

Choose which type of medication you're currently using to treat your RA.

Table of Contents
  • Introduction

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  • Change in RA Symptoms

    Overall, are your RA symptoms of flare-ups, including pain, stiffness, and inflammation, worse than they were three months ago?

  • Fatigue and Morning Stiffness

    Are your symptoms of fatigue and morning stiffness, worse than they were three months ago?

  • RA Symptoms in New Joints

    Are you experiencing RA symptoms (pain, swelling, or stiffness) in new or different joints?

  • Ability to Carry Common Items

    Rate your ability (1-3) to pick up your child or carry common items (like a laptop computer) across the room.

  • Ability to Get Up

    Rate your ability (1-3) to get up from a chair, get out of bed, or get out of a car.

  • Ability to Type

    Rate your ability (1-3) to type on a computer keyboard or use a smart phone or tablet.

  • Nausea After Taking RA Medication

    Do you experience stomach problems or nausea after taking your RA medication?

  • Fatigue After Taking RA Medication

    Do you feel tired or fatigued the day of (or the day after) you take your RA medication?

  • Your Current RA Medication

    Do you feel like you’re doing well with your current RA medication?

  • Your Current Medication Type

    Choose which type of medication you’re currently using to treat your RA.

1 of 11

Below are the results from your assessment. Talk to your doctor about next steps in your recovery process.

Score 10-12:

You’re likely experiencing mild RA symptoms with a minimal level of disability and pain. You’re generally able to perform all of your normal daily activities without assistance, and your disease is likely under control.

If you still have questions or if you condition changes, take this assessment with you and discuss your condition with your doctor or rheumatologist.

Score 13 and up:

You’re likely experiencing moderate or advancing RA symptoms with a noticeable level of disability and periods of unresolved pain. You may require assistance to perform some of your normal daily tasks, and your symptoms are likely getting worse.

Take this assessment with you and discuss your condition with your doctor or rheumatologist. You may also want to discuss changing your current medications and exploring other treatment options.

Next Steps:

Print or email a copy of your results
to discuss with your doctor.