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Risperidone Oral solution

It is used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and some symptoms of autism

Generic Name: risperidone  |  Brand Name: Risperdal M-Tab

Brand Names: Risperdal, Risperdal Consta, Risperdal M-Tab

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

Special Alerts:

[Posted 06/13/2011] ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and the public of medication error reports in which patients were given risperidone (Risperdal) instead of ropinirole (Requip) and vice versa. In some cases, patients who took the wrong medication needed to be hospitalized.

The FDA determined that the factors contributing to the confusion between the two products include:

  • Similarities of both the brand (proprietary) and generic (established) names
  • Similarities of the container labels and carton packaging
  • Illegible handwriting on prescriptions
  • Overlapping product characteristics, such as the drug strengths, dosage forms, and dosing intervals.

BACKGROUND: Risperidone (Risperdal) is an antipsychotic medication used to treat mental illnesses including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability associated with autistic disorder. Ropinirole (Requip) is a dopamine agonist used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and Restless Legs Syndrome.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare Professionals are reminded to clearly print or spell out the medication name on prescriptions and make certain their patients know the name of their prescribed medication and their reason for taking it. For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

[Posted 02/22/2011] ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals that the Pregnancy section of drug labels for the entire class of antipsychotic drugs has been updated. The new drug labels now contain more and consistent information about the potential risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal signs or EPS) and withdrawal symptoms in newborns whose mothers were treated with these drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy.

The symptoms of EPS and withdrawal in newborns may include agitation, abnormally increased or decreased muscle tone, tremor, sleepiness, severe difficulty breathing, and difficulty in feeding. In some newborns, the symptoms subside within hours or days and do not require specific treatment; other newborns may require longer hospital stays.

BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should be aware of the effects of antipsychotic medications on newborns when the medications are used during pregnancy. Patients should not stop taking these medications if they become pregnant without talking to their healthcare professional, as abruptly stopping antipsychotic medications can cause significant complications for treatment. For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

What is this medicine?

RISPERIDONE (ris PER i done) is an antipsychotic. It is used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and some symptoms of autism.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • blood disorder or disease
  • dementia
  • diabetes or a family history of diabetes
  • difficulty swallowing
  • heart disease or previous heart attack
  • history of brain tumor or head injury
  • history of breast cancer
  • irregular heartbeat or low blood pressure
  • kidney or liver disease
  • Parkinson's disease
  • seizures (convulsions)
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to risperidone, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Use the specially marked dropper in the bottle to measure each dose. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. Take your dose alone or mix your dose with low-fat milk, orange juice, water, or coffee just before taking. Do NOT mix the solution with cola, carbonated beverages, or tea. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 5 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • cisapride
  • droperidol
  • sparfloxacin

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • arsenic trioxide
  • carbamazepine
  • certain medicines for the hormonal treatment of cancer
  • certain quinolone antibiotics like gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin
  • clarithromycin
  • levodopa and other medications for Parkinson's disease
  • medicines for high blood pressure
  • medicines for irregular heartbeats
  • medicines for seizures (convulsions)
  • medicines for sleep or sedation
  • other medicines for mental anxiety, depression or psychotic disturbances
  • pentamidine
  • prescription pain medications
  • rifampin
  • ritonavir

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. It may be several weeks before you see the full effects. Do not suddenly stop taking this medicine. You may need to gradually reduce the dose. Only stop taking this medicine on the advice of your doctor or health care professional.

You may get dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks. You can get a hangover effect the morning after a bedtime dose.

Do not treat yourself for colds, diarrhea or allergies. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice, some nonprescription medicines may increase possible side effects.

This medicine can reduce the response of your body to heat or cold. Dress warm in cold weather and stay hydrated in hot weather. If possible, avoid extreme temperatures like saunas, hot tubs, very hot or cold showers, or activities that can cause dehydration such as vigorous exercise.


Last Updated: May 07, 2013
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