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Pramlintide Acetate Solution for injection

It is used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults

Generic Name: pramlintide  |  Brand Name: Symlin

Brand Names: SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60, Symlin

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

    Insulin-induced Hypoglycemia
  • Increased risk of severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia with concomitant pramlintide and insulin therapy, particularly in patients with type 1 diabetes.
  • Generally occurs within 3 hours after injection with pramlintide.
  • Potential for serious injuries if severe hypoglycemia occurs while operating a motor vehicle, heavy machinery, or while engaging in other high-risk activities.
  • Appropriate patient selection, careful patient instruction, and insulin dose adjustments required. (See Hypoglycemia under Cautions.)

What is this medicine?

PRAMLINTIDE (PRAM lin tide) is a man-made form of a hormone normally found in the body. It is used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults. This medicine works with insulin to control blood sugar.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • HbA1c above 9
  • low blood sugar episodes
  • problems checking blood sugar
  • problems taking diabetes medicine
  • stomach problems like gastroparesis
  • trouble being able to tell when blood sugar is low
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to pramlintide, metacresol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. You will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. Use exactly as directed. Do not mix this medicine with insulin in the same syringe. Take this medicine immediately before meals. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Always check the appearance of this medicine before using it. Do not use it if it is cloudy or has solid particles in it.

It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss a dose. Your health care professional or doctor should discuss a plan for missed doses with you. If you do miss a dose, follow their plan. Do not take double doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • atropine
  • cisapride
  • erythromycin
  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances
  • medicines used to treat stomach problems
  • narcotic medicines for pain
  • other medicines for diabetes like acarbose, miglitol
  • tegaserod

Many medications may cause changes in blood sugar, these include:

  • alcohol containing beverages
  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs
  • chloramphenicol
  • chromium
  • female hormones, such as estrogens or progestins, birth control pills
  • heart medicines
  • isoniazid
  • male hormones or anabolic steroids
  • medications for weight loss
  • medicines for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough
  • medicines for mental problems
  • medicines called MAO inhibitors - Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, Eldepryl
  • niacin
  • NSAIDS, such as ibuprofen
  • pentamidine
  • phenytoin
  • probenecid
  • quinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin
  • some herbal dietary supplements
  • steroid medicines such as prednisone or cortisone
  • thyroid hormones
  • diuretics

Some medications can hide the warning symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). You may need to monitor your blood sugar more closely if you are taking one of these medications. These include:

  • beta-blockers, often used for high blood pressure or heart problems (examples include atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol)
  • clonidine
  • guanethidine
  • reserpine


Last Updated: July 24, 2009
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