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Pimecrolimus Topical cream

It is used on the skin to treat eczema.

Generic Name: pimecrolimus topical

Brand Names: Elidel

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

What is this medicine?

PIMECROLIMUS (pim e KROW li mus) is used on the skin to treat eczema.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • cold sores or shingles
  • decreased immune function
  • Netherton's syndrome
  • receiving any form of light therapy (phototherapy, UVA, or UVB) to your skin
  • skin infection
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to pimecrolimus, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is applied to the skin. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Wash your hands before and after use. If treating a hand infection, wash hands before use only. Apply a thin layer to the affected areas. Rub in gently and completely. Usually, you will continue using the cream until the areas heal. Do not cover the treated skin with bandages or other dressings. Do not use your medicine more often than directed or for other types of skin conditions unless directed by your health care provider.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 2 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • alcoholic beverages or medicines containing high percentages of alcohol
  • calcium channel blockers like diltiazem, nifedipine, nimodipine, nisoldipine
  • certain medicines used to treat fungal infections like itraconazole, ketoconazole, and fluconazole
  • cimetidine
  • erythromycin
  • vaccines

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Improvements to your skin may occur after the first few weeks of treatment. Even though your skin looks better, it is important to keep using the cream as instructed by your health care provider. If you do not notice an improvement in your condition within 6 weeks or if your condition gets worse, tell your health care professional.

Avoid sunlight, sun lamps, tanning beds and treatment with UVA or UVB light while using this medicine. If you need to be outdoors after applying the cream, wear loose fitting clothing that protects the treated area from the sun. Ask your health care provider what other type of sun protection you should use.

Do not cover the skin being treated with bandages, dressings, or wraps. Unless otherwise instructed by your health care provider, do not apply another type of skin product on top of this medicine. However, you can wear normal clothing over the treated areas.

Do not bathe, shower, or swim right after applying this medicine. This could wash off the cream.

While you are using this medicine, drinking alcohol may cause the skin or face to become flushed or red and feel hot. Let your doctor or health care professional know if you notice such reactions.


Last Updated: July 20, 2009
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