Drugs A - Z

Perphenazine Oral tablet

It is used to treat schizophrenia

Generic Name: perphenazine  |  Brand Name: Trilafon

Brand Names: Trilafon

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

Special Alerts:

[Posted 02/22/2011] ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals that the Pregnancy section of drug labels for the entire class of antipsychotic drugs has been updated. The new drug labels now contain more and consistent information about the potential risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal signs or EPS) and withdrawal symptoms in newborns whose mothers were treated with these drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy.

The symptoms of EPS and withdrawal in newborns may include agitation, abnormally increased or decreased muscle tone, tremor, sleepiness, severe difficulty breathing, and difficulty in feeding. In some newborns, the symptoms subside within hours or days and do not require specific treatment; other newborns may require longer hospital stays.

BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should be aware of the effects of antipsychotic medications on newborns when the medications are used during pregnancy. Patients should not stop taking these medications if they become pregnant without talking to their healthcare professional, as abruptly stopping antipsychotic medications can cause significant complications for treatment. For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

What is this medicine?

PERPHENAZINE (per FEN a zeen) is used to treat schizophrenia. It also is used to treat severe nausea and vomiting in adults.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • blood disorders or disease
  • dementia
  • liver disease or jaundice
  • Parkinson's disease
  • uncontrollable movement disorder
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to perphenazine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this medicine may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • amoxapine
  • antidepressants like citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline
  • certain antibiotics like gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin
  • cisapride
  • clozapine
  • dofetilide
  • droperidol
  • ibutilide
  • levomethadyl
  • maprotiline
  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine
  • phenylpropanolamine
  • pimozide
  • pindolol
  • propranolol
  • sotalol
  • tricyclic antidepressants like amitriptyline, clomipramine, imipramine, nortriptyline and others
  • trimethobenzamide
  • ziprasidone

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • antacids
  • medicines for colds and flu
  • medicines for hay fever and other allergies
  • prescription pain medicines

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine can reduce the response of your body to heat or cold. Dress warm in cold weather and stay hydrated in hot weather. If possible, avoid extreme temperatures like saunas, hot tubs, very hot or cold showers, or activities that can cause dehydration such as vigorous exercise.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.


Last Updated: May 07, 2013
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