Drugs A - Z

Oxymorphone Hydrochloride Oral tablet

It is used to treat moderate to severe pain

Generic Name: oxymorphone  |  Brand Name: Opana

Brand Names: Opana, Opana ER

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

What is this medicine?

OXYMORPHINE (ox i MOR feen) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • brain tumor
  • drug abuse or addiction
  • head injury
  • heart disease
  • if you frequently drink alcohol-containing drinks
  • intestinal disease
  • kidney disease
  • kyphoscoliosis
  • liver disease
  • lung disease, asthma, or breathing problems
  • seizures
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to oxymorphone, codeine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not break, crush, or chew this medicine. Do not take broken tablets. Taking broken, chewed, crushed or dissolved tablets can be very dangerous. You may get too much medicine, too fast. Take this medicine on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after food. Do not take with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • alcohol or any product that contains alcohol

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • antihistamines for allergy, cough and cold
  • atropine
  • benzodiazepines
  • certain medicines for bladder problems like oxybutynin, tolterodine
  • certain medicines for Parkinson's disease like benztropine, trihexyphenidyl
  • certain medicines for stomach problems like dicyclomine, hyoscyamine
  • certain medicines for travel sickness like scopolamine
  • ipratropium
  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances
  • medicines for sleep
  • muscle relaxants
  • naltrexone
  • narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain
  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not go away, if it gets worse, or if you have new or a different type of pain. You may develop tolerance to the medicine. Tolerance means that you will need a higher dose of the medicine for pain relief. Tolerance is normal and is expected if you take this medicine for a long time.

Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your body becomes used to the medicine. This does NOT mean you are addicted. Addiction is a behavior related to getting and using a drug for a non-medical reason. If you have pain, you have a medical reason to take pain medicine. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

Do not consume alcoholic beverages, or prescription or non-prescription medications that have alcohol, while on this medicine. Taking this medicine with alcohol can be very dangerous. You may get too much medicine, too fast.

There are different types of narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain. If you take more than one type at the same time, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing.

This medicine will cause constipation. Try to have a bowel movement at least every 2 to 3 days. If you do not have a bowel movement for 3 days, call your doctor or health care professional.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

This medicine may cause dry eyes and blurred vision. If you wear contact lenses you may feel some discomfort. Lubricating drops may help. See your eye doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.


Last Updated: August 23, 2012
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