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Insulin Glargine Solution for injection

This drug lowers the amount of sugar in your blood

Generic Name: insulin glargine

Brand Names: Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

Special Alerts:

FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that it is aware of four recently-published observational studies that looked at the use of insulin glargine (Lantus) and possible risk for cancer in patients with diabetes. Three of the four studies suggest an increased risk for cancer associated with use of insulin glargine. Based on the currently available data, the FDA recommends that patients should not stop taking their insulin therapy without consulting a physician, since uncontrolled blood sugar levels can have both immediate and long-term serious adverse effects.

FDA is currently reviewing many sources of safety data for insulin glargine, including these newly published observational studies, data from all completed controlled clinical trials, and information about ongoing controlled clinical trials, to better understand the risk, if any, for cancer associated with use of insulin glargine. Discussions are also ongoing between FDA and the manufacturer of insulin glargine as to whether any additional studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of this drug will need to be performed. FDA will communicate the results on its ongoing review to the public, as appropriate, as our review continues.

The FDA encourages both healthcare professionals and patients to report side effects from the use of insulin glargine to the FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program. For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

What is this medicine?

INSULIN GLARGINE (IN su lin GLAR geen) is a human-made form of insulin. This drug lowers the amount of sugar in your blood. It is a long-acting insulin that is usually given once a day.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • episodes of hypoglycemia
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to insulin, metacresol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. Use exactly as directed. It is important to follow the directions given to you by your health care professional or doctor. You will be taught how to use this medicine and how to adjust doses for activities and illness. You may take this medicine at any time of the day but you must take it at the same time everyday. Do not use more insulin than prescribed. Do not use more or less often than prescribed.

Always check the appearance of your insulin before using it. This medicine should be clear and colorless like water. Do not use it if it is cloudy, thickened, colored, or has solid particles in it.

Do not mix this medicine with any other insulin or diluent.

It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss a dose. Your health care professional or doctor should discuss a plan for missed doses with you. If you do miss a dose, follow their plan. Do not take double doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • other medicines for diabetes

Many medications may cause an increase or decrease in blood sugar, these include:

  • alcohol containing beverages
  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs
  • chloramphenicol
  • chromium
  • diuretics
  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills
  • heart medicines
  • isoniazid
  • male hormones or anabolic steroids
  • medicines for weight loss
  • medicines for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough
  • medicines for mental problems
  • medicines called MAO Inhibitors like Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, Eldepryl
  • niacin
  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
  • pentamidine
  • phenytoin
  • probenecid
  • quinolone antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin
  • some herbal dietary supplements
  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone
  • thyroid medicine

Some medications can hide the warning symptoms of low blood sugar. You may need to monitor your blood sugar more closely if you are taking one of these medications. These include:

  • beta-blockers such as atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol
  • clonidine
  • guanethidine
  • reserpine


Last Updated: August 12, 2013
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