Drugs A - Z

Goserelin Acetate Implant

It lowers the amount of sex hormones that the body makes

Generic Name: goserelin

Brand Names: Zoladex

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

What is this medicine?

GOSERELIN (GOE se rel in) is similar to a hormone found in the body. It lowers the amount of sex hormones that the body makes. Men will have lower testosterone levels and women will have lower estrogen levels while taking this medicine. In men, this medicine is used to treat prostate cancer; the injection is either given once per month or once every 12 weeks. A once per month injection (only) is used to treat women with endometriosis, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, or advanced breast cancer.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions (some only apply to women):
  • diabetes
  • heart disease or previous heart attack
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • kidney disease
  • osteoporosis or low bone density
  • problems passing urine
  • spinal cord injury
  • stroke
  • tobacco smoker
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to goserelin, hormone therapy, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting. Men receive this injection once every 4 weeks or once every 12 weeks. Women will only receive the once every 4 weeks injection.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss your dose. Call your doctor or health care professional if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • female hormones like estrogen
  • herbal or dietary supplements like black cohosh, chasteberry, or DHEA
  • male hormones like testosterone
  • prasterone

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your symptoms may appear to get worse during the first weeks of this therapy. Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse after this time.

Your bones may get weaker if you take this medicine for a long time. If you smoke or frequently drink alcohol you may increase your risk of bone loss. A family history of osteoporosis, chronic use of drugs for seizures (convulsions), or corticosteroids can also increase your risk of bone loss. Talk to your doctor about how to keep your bones strong.

This medicine should stop regular monthly menstration in women. Tell your doctor if you continue to menstrate.

Women should not become pregnant while taking this medicine or for 12 weeks after stopping this medicine. Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information. Do not breast-feed an infant while taking this medicine.

Men should inform their doctors if they wish to father a child. This medicine may lower sperm counts. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information.


Last Updated: May 04, 2010
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